Amedaki Waterfall (Amedaki [雨滝]) and Nunobiki Waterfall (Nunobiki-no-taki [布引の滝])

Kurayoshi, near Tottori, Tottori Prefecture, Japan

Rating: 3     Difficulty: 1.5
The Amedaki Waterfall

TABLE OF CONTENTS



[Back to top]

INTRODUCTION

The Amedaki Waterfall (Amedaki [雨滝]; also called Amedaki Falls) was one of our easier visits to a waterfall in Japan. It was where the Fukuro River (Fukurogawa) dropped some 40m over a columnar basalt cliff. We were able to see evidence of the signature basalt columns adjacent to the falls attesting to its formation. Translating the kanji into Chinese, we gleaned that the direct translation of the waterfall's name was the "Rain Falls". Perhaps because the falls was only at an elevation of 500m, the nearby Mt Ooginosen may be a major rain catchment and source of the watercourse responsible for the falls, and thus might have gotten its name this way. During our visit, the falls had pretty full flow as it was probably helped by the rainy day that we had experienced the day before our visit here. Adding further legitimacy to this falls was that it was gazetted as one of Japan's Top 100 Waterfalls by the Japanese Ministry of the Environment.

Located just a little over 100m downstream of the Amedaki Falls was the Nunobiki Waterfall (Nunobiki-no-taki [布引の滝]; or just Nunobiki Falls). Sometimes I've seen this falls called the Amedaki-Nunobiki Falls to distinguish it from the Nunobiki Falls in Kobe. Contrasting the Amedaki Falls, Nunobiki Falls took on a more slender and graceful shape. It was said that its waterflow wouldn't change regardless of heavy rain or lack of rain, because its stream was sourced by groundwater on the sloping mountainside. Translating the kanji into Chinese, we gleaned that the waterfall's name had something to do with cloth perhaps suggesting that the shape of the falls reminded someone of perhaps a dress or a long piece of cloth. Anyways, an interpretive sign here associated the larger Amedaki Falls as being masculine while this waterfall was characterized as being feminine. We'll leave it up to you how to interpret this association.

Our visit to both of these waterfalls started from a car park right at the end of the Amedaki Road (see directions below). We walked about 100m to a fork where we initially kept right and got to an obstructed view of the Amedaki Falls. So we came back to the fork then went down the steps past a restroom building before getting to the bottom of the descent. Once we got down there, we were face-to-face with the graceful Nunobiki Waterfall fronted by the Fukurogawa as well as some picnic tables. After getting our fill of this falls, we then continued walking gently uphill about 150m along the main trail passing by a cascade behind a bridge as well as a shelter showing what I believe to be San'in Kaigan Geopark highlights. That was when we were at a bridge as well as a small stone figurine fronting the impressive Amedaki Waterfall.

The trail continued past the bridge and climbed up a slippery and muddy path, but we chose not to go further as the conditions were a bit on the treacherous side, and we still had a long drive ahead of us towards Osaka. So after taking our time enjoying both the Amedaki and Nunobiki Waterfalls, we then got back to the car spending about an hour away from it. But given the short walking distances, we'd imagine one could easily experience this place in as little as 15-30 minutes.

By the way, the Amedaki Waterfall was part of the San'in Kaigan Geopark (which probably explained why the shelter had interpretive signs highlighting other such geoparks in Japan). Apparently, the focus of these parks was to showcase geological features and landmarks that were derived from the formation of the Sea of Japan. I guess, much of the natural features along the Northern Coast of Japan, especially in the Tottori Prefecture owed their existence to such geological events. And I'm guessing that the formation of these geoparks might have been a way to generate some tourism traffic to these relatively overlooked places (at least as far as the main island of Honshu was concerned).

Finally, I also wanted to mention that there was some interesting signage accompanying the San'in Kaigan Geopark signage at the trailhead for this waterfall. It concerned a sign containing kanji (or Chinese) writing right above the geopark sign saying something like "中国白然歩道" meaning "China White Nature Trail". We took this to mean that this must be some Chinese sign or Chinese trail, which was very surprising and unusual, to say the least. We could have mistook the meaning or intent of this sign, but we're quite curious as to why this sign was here in the first place. If anyone can explain why, please let us know!




[Back to top]

PHOTO JOURNAL

This was the Nunobiki Falls, which was the companion waterfall to Amedaki FallsThis was the Nunobiki Falls, which was the companion waterfall to Amedaki Falls
The Amedaki Falls was less than an hour's drive from the Tottori Sand Dunes, which was one of Japan's more unusual and surprising featuresThe Amedaki Falls was less than an hour's drive from the Tottori Sand Dunes, which was one of Japan's more unusual and surprising features
East of Tottori was the impressive northern coastal scenery of the Anami Coast, where we could see the Sea of Japan eroding away at some eccentric lava and rock formationsEast of Tottori was the impressive northern coastal scenery of the Anami Coast, where we could see the Sea of Japan eroding away at some eccentric lava and rock formations
The nearest car park for the Amedaki WaterfallThe nearest car park for the Amedaki Waterfall

Looking back towards some souvenir shop or something near the car park where we stopped the carLooking back towards some souvenir shop or something near the car park where we stopped the car

The signposted fork where keeping right led to a partial viewpoint of the Amedaki Waterfall while going left down the steps would lead down to both the Nunobiki Falls and Amedaki FallsThe signposted fork where keeping right led to a partial viewpoint of the Amedaki Waterfall while going left down the steps would lead down to both the Nunobiki Falls and Amedaki Falls

Initially, we kept right and got this unsatisfactory view of the Amedaki FallsInitially, we kept right and got this unsatisfactory view of the Amedaki Falls

Dad and Mom making it to the bottom of the descentDad and Mom making it to the bottom of the descent

Once we were at the bottom of the descent, we got this view of the Nunobiki WaterfallOnce we were at the bottom of the descent, we got this view of the Nunobiki Waterfall

Picnic tables fronting the base of Nunobiki FallsPicnic tables fronting the base of Nunobiki Falls

At the bridge at the bottom of the descent, we looked upstream at this attractive cascade, which was next to a shelter with signs talking about other San'in Kaigan Geopark attractionsAt the bridge at the bottom of the descent, we looked upstream at this attractive cascade, which was next to a shelter with signs talking about other San'in Kaigan Geopark attractions

Now approaching the larger Amedaki WaterfallNow approaching the larger Amedaki Waterfall

Mom checking out the Amedaki WaterfallMom checking out the Amedaki Waterfall

Near the base of the Amedaki Waterfall, we noticed this figurine as well as some offerings beneath a rockNear the base of the Amedaki Waterfall, we noticed this figurine as well as some offerings beneath a rock

View of Amedaki from the bridgeView of Amedaki from the bridge

The cliffs around Amedaki exhibited evidence of the basalt layer that gave rise to the waterfallThe cliffs around Amedaki exhibited evidence of the basalt layer that gave rise to the waterfall

Looking back at the context of the bridge fronting the Amedaki Waterfall from the muddy trail on the other side of the FukurogawaLooking back at the context of the bridge fronting the Amedaki Waterfall from the muddy trail on the other side of the Fukurogawa

Dad heading back in the direction of the Amedaki Car ParkDad heading back in the direction of the Amedaki Car Park

Last look at the attractive cascade next to the shelter before climbing back up to the car park


[Back to top]

VIDEOS OF THE FALLS


Starting off with checking out Nunobiki Falls before walking over to Amedaki Falls and checking it out from a few different spots


[Back to top]

DRIVING DIRECTIONS

Driving to the Amedaki Waterfall was thankfully pretty easy for us as there was already signage pointing the way to the falls right from the city of Tottori! So in following the signs, we wound up pretty much finding our way to the Route 323 going south, then heading east onto Route 31. We'd follow the Route 31 for about 20km towards the end of the Amedaki Road, which was where we reached the nearest car park. Overall, this drive only took us about 30 minutes.

To give you some geographical context, the city of Tottori was 131km (2 hours drive) north of Himeji, 173km (2.5 hours drive) northwest of Kobe, 189km (about 3 hours drive) northwest of Osaka, and 216km (over 3 hours drive) west-northwest of Kyoto.




[Back to top]

ITINERARIES

For more information about our itineraries involving this waterfall, check out the following links.




[Back to top]

MAP OF THE FALLS



Click here for the full World of Waterfalls map





[Back to top]

TRIP REPORTS

For more information about our experiences with this waterfall, check out the following travel stories.




[Back to top]

TRIP PLANNING RESOURCES




[Back to top]

NEARBY WATERFALLS




[Back to top]

RELATED PAGES



Have You Been To This Waterfall?

Share your experience!

Click here to see visitor comments for this waterfall

Click here to see visitor comments for other waterfalls that we've visited in this region

Click here to go to the Comments Main Page

You can use the form below, but if you find our host's interface too troublesome to use (especially if you're trying to upload photos), then just send a text submission anyways using the form, but also let us know that you'd like to attach photos. If you've provided an email address via the form, then we can reply back acknowledging your request, and you can then reply to that email with your photo attachments. We're very sorry about this, but there's not much we can do about SBI's terrible interface.



[Go to the Japan Waterfalls Page]

[Go to the Asia Page]


[Return from Amedaki Waterfall and Nunobiki Waterfall to the World of Waterfalls Home Page]