Diaoshuilou Waterfall (吊水楼瀑布 [Diàoshuǐlóu Pùbù])

Jingpo Hu, Heilongjiang Province, China

Rating: 0.5     Difficulty: 1
Even though it's dry, one can imagine how big this waterfall would be if it were flowing normally

TABLE OF CONTENTS



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INTRODUCTION

The Diaoshuilou Waterfall (吊水楼瀑布 [Diàoshuǐlóu Pùbù]) was said to be the 3rd largest waterfall in China. But you probably wouldn't know it from the photos shown on this page because it was practically dry on our visit. All that was left was maybe a trickle that remained from a small spring towards the bottom of the center of horseshoe-shaped wall.

We learned from our visit here that hydroelectric developments upstream had caused this falls to flow normally only during periods of flood in the mid- to late Summer months. Beyond September, the falls would degenerate into a disappointing trickle like when we saw it in May 2009. Needless to say, our visit was a big letdown, especially given how much trouble it took to get here. You know how pathetic it was when we were relegated to looking forward to some local guy doing a cliff dive off the top of the cliff where the falls should've been. By the way, if you are interested in seeing this guy do his shtick, come here at 10am and at 2pm as apparently he does this every day twice a day.

It's a shame they messed up this falls the way they did. You could see from the photo above that if the falls were flowing, it'd be a real mighty display of force and size. Oh well, not meant to be. Maybe next time.

The waterfall was near the Jingpo Hu (Mirror Lake), which was so named because apparently it had mirror-like qualities. Except during our visit, the lake was a bit too ripply for that to happen. Boat rides circling the lake seemed to be the common thing to do here as there were some palaces on mini-islands within this lake. They costed extra, however, so we didn't do anything beyond the baseline tour for the lake.




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PHOTO JOURNAL

While on a boat tour, we took a look at the palaces of the Jingpo Hu, which was very close to the Diaoshuilou WaterfallWhile on a boat tour, we took a look at the palaces of the Jingpo Hu, which was very close to the Diaoshuilou Waterfall
We started the long travel day (to get to Diaoshuilou Waterfall and the Jingpo Hu) in Haerbin, which had some residual Russian influence like the Church of St SofiaWe started the long travel day (to get to Diaoshuilou Waterfall and the Jingpo Hu) in Haerbin, which had some residual Russian influence like the Church of St Sofia
Haerbin was also the city where we got to see captive Siberian TigersHaerbin was also the city where we got to see captive Siberian Tigers
Not all the Diaoshuilou Waterfall was totally dry as evidenced by the trickle at the very bottom of the fallsNot all of the falls was totally dry as evidenced by the trickle at the very bottom of the falls

The horseshoe-shaped cliff typical of high volume waterfallsThe horseshoe-shaped cliff typical of high volume waterfalls, which testifies to how mighty this waterfall once was

Unusual view looking downstreamUnusual view looking downstream. I say this was unusual because had there been water going over the falls, we wouldn't have been able to take this photo

The local guy doing his cliff diveThe local guy doing his cliff dive

Cruising on the Jingpo HuCruising on the Jingo Hu


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VIDEOS OF THE FALLS


The waterfall wasn't flowing, but at least this guy did a dive to entertain everyone. Apparently, he's quite the veteran at this (even when the falls would be in full flood).


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DRIVING DIRECTIONS

It took us about 90 minutes by car from Mudanjiang to Jingpo Hu (Mirror Lake; though it definitely wasn't mirroring in our trip). It was another 90 minutes or so to get from Jingpo Hu to Dunhua where we spent the night.

It took us a bit of trouble to get here because we actually started in the city of Haerbin, which was a transport hub for us (as well as a place to see Siberian Tigers as well as other big cats in captivity). Then, we took a long train ride to get to Mudanjiang (probably about 4 hours).

For geographical context, Haerbin was 1,250km (12.5 hours drive or 90 minutes flight) northeast of Beijing.




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ITINERARIES

For more information about our itineraries involving this waterfall, check out the following links.




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MAP OF THE FALLS



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TRIP REPORTS

For more information about our experiences with this waterfall, check out the following travel stories.




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TRIP PLANNING RESOURCES




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NEARBY WATERFALLS




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RELATED PAGES



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