Nohsngithiang Falls (Seven Sisters Falls)

East Khasi Hills District / Cherrapunjee (Sohra), Meghalaya, India

Rating: 1     Difficulty: 1
Profile of a mostly trickling Nohsngithiang Falls

TABLE OF CONTENTS



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INTRODUCTION

Nohsngithiang Falls was sometimes referred to as the Seven Sisters Falls due to the presence of several strands of cascades coming down in parallel. However, I presume some guy envisioned there were seven of them during the monsoon as Julie and I didn't see much of the waterfall during our November 2009 visit. By the way, this shouldn't be confused with the similarly-named Seven Sisters in the Geirangerfjord of Norway.

As shown in the pictures on this page, we noticed that this waterfall had a rather short life since we showed up barely a month after the "official" end of the monsoon in India's northeast. I reckoned we would've had to have been here right during the monsoon in order to see the falls under more impressive flow. It also didn't help that 2009 had an abnormally weak monsoon, which the locals we'd been in touch with blamed it on Global Warming.

Now had we shown up during the monsoon between late September or early October (which I believe would be the most optimal time to see the falls in its highest volume), we would've had to deal with a bit of a catch-22 where the monsoon would yield the rain, but the increased likelihood of clouds might have made the falls itself hard to see.

In addition to the contextual views from across the ravine draining towards Bangladesh, we were also able to get right up to the top of this waterfall. And from that vantage point, there was the so-called Missing Waterfall, which was nothing more than the watercourse disappearing into a narrow slot chasm in the ground before re-emerging as part of the Seven Sisters Waterfall. There was a separate dedicated car park and section to experience the waterfall from this spot.

From the same vantage point for this waterfall, we also noticed a distant but tall waterfall that was also lightflowing. I wasn't able to recall whether it was part of the Nohsngithiang Falls from a different vantage point or if it was a different waterfall entirely.




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PHOTO JOURNAL

Looking into the haze in the direction of Bangladesh from the Seven Sisters WaterfallLooking into the haze in the direction of Bangladesh from the Seven Sisters Waterfall
Zoomed in partial view of the Nohsngithiang Fallss to show there's still some of the falls left when we were thereZoomed in partial view of the falls to show there's still some of the falls left when we were there

A slightly more contextual view of the Nohsngithiang FallsA slightly more contextual view of the falls

The Missing WaterfallThe Missing Waterfall (possibly contributing to the flow of the Seven Sisters Waterfall)

Distant view of some other waterfall on the way towards the Seven Sisters WaterfallDistant view of some other waterfall on the way towards the Seven Sisters Waterfall (actually, I'm not sure if this was part of the Seven Sisters Waterfall or not)

Here's a more zoomed in view of that distant waterfall on the way towards the Seven Sisters WaterfallHere's a more zoomed in view of that distant waterfall on the way towards the Seven Sisters Waterfall

Profile view of one of the waterfalls by the Missing Waterfall, which I suspect was at the top of the Nohsngithiang FallsProfile view of one of the waterfalls by the Missing Waterfall, which I suspect was at the top of the Nohsngithiang Falls


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VIDEOS OF THE FALLS


What's left of the Nohsngithiang Falls (also known as the Seven Sisters) a month after the end of an abnormally weak monsoon


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DRIVING DIRECTIONS

We were a little bit disoriented once we got into Cherrapunjee or Sohra since we were being escorted everywhere we went. However, I recalled we didn't have to go far (maybe less than 10km) from town to get to both the distant informal viewing area plus the top of the Nohsngithiang Falls.

From Shillong to Cherrapunjee was roughly 53km, which took us about 90 minutes since we had to contend with slower moving trucks holding up traffic.

For geographical context, Shillong was 99km (2.5 hours drive) south of Guwahati. Guwahati was about a 2.5 hour flight from Delhi.




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ITINERARIES

For more information about our itineraries involving this waterfall, check out the following links.




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MAP OF THE FALLS



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TRIP REPORTS

For more information about our experiences with this waterfall, check out the following travel stories.




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TRIP PLANNING RESOURCES




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NEARBY WATERFALLS




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What Other Visitors Have Said

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Paradise on earth 
I have been to this place along with my parents on 19 Sep 10. I have never seen such a beautiful and cool place any where. I had been at J&K, Himachal …

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