Qingshan Waterfall (青山瀑布 [Qīngshān Pùbù])

Yangmingshan National Park / Shimen District, Xinbei County (New Taipei), Taiwan

Rating: 2     Difficulty: 2.5
The Qingshan Waterfall

TABLE OF CONTENTS



[Back to top]

INTRODUCTION

The Qingshan Waterfall (青山瀑布 [Qīngshān Pùbù]; translated as "Blue Mountain Waterfall") was a modestly-sized waterfall on the quieter north side of Yangmingshan (陽明山 [Yángmíngshān]), which was an area more known for hot springs than a nature hike like this. Our relatively quiet experience with both the hike and the waterfall itself was a bit of a surprise to us because it was so close to the metropolitan city of Taipei (as it was just on the other side of Yangmingshan), yet it seemed like a whole other world away as the scenery was very naturesque and tranquil. Anyways, as you can see from the photo above, this waterfall had a pleasing fan or triangular shape (though it was probably aided from the heavy rains in the area earlier on in the morning of our hike), and I'm guessing it was probably about 15-20m tall.

From the signed car park, we walked back along the road towards a roadside stand. After passing through the stand, which had picnic tables and locally-sourced food, we then climbed up a flight of steps ascending above the road and ultimately towards a small plot of farm land adjacent to the trail. The trail initially meandered alongside the small plots of land (where they were growing local vegetables) then it curved alongside a valley carved out by the Laomei Stream (老梅溪 [Lǎoméi Xī]; translated as "Old Lady Stream"). Along this stretch of the trail, we followed along a ditch that I'm guessing diverted water from the creek from further upstream and ultimately irrigated the small farm plot.

The trail continued to follow along the ditch while the valley closed in the further along the trail we went. After another 300m or so, the irrigation ditches started to disappear as the trail then crossed and meandered alongside one of the forks of the Laomei Stream. After crossing a few bridges traversing the stream, the trail then became a bit rougher as it followed along the stream banks involving a small bit of minor bouldering. We had to be careful due to the wet nature of the boulders given the rains. Anyways, this stretch would persist for the next 400-500m before we finally climbed up to the lookout deck yielding the view of Qingshan Waterfall that you see pictured at the top of this page.

Once we were at the falls, I noticed that the trail apparently kept going up the mountain, but it was closed so we can't say anything more about it. Thus, we spent time basking in the reward of making it all the way here, and when we had our fill of this place, we did the mostly downhill hike all the way back to the car. On the return hike, we noticed quite a few more people making their way up (we were the only people at the falls as well as the entire hike up here), which illustrated just how popular this place can be despite the bad weather. When all was said and done, we wound up finishing the hike in a little over 90 minutes covering a distance of around 3km round trip.




[Back to top]

PHOTO JOURNAL

This was the coastal scenery when we made the drive from Keelung to Yangmingshan on a rainy dayThis was the coastal scenery when we made the drive from Keelung to Yangmingshan on a rainy day
Looking back from the namesake temple in the Miaokou Night Market in the heart of Keelung City, which was where we stayed before driving up to the Qingshan Falls TrailheadLooking back from the namesake temple in the Miaokou Night Market in the heart of Keelung City, which was where we stayed before driving up to the Qingshan Falls Trailhead
Further south along the coast southeast of Keelung was Jinguashi and Jiufen, which were historical towns where gold then coal were extracted for the JapaneseFurther south along the coast southeast of Keelung was Jinguashi and Jiufen, which were historical towns where gold then coal were extracted for the Japanese
Just on the other side of Yangmingshan was Taipei, which was Taiwan's capital as well as the country's largest cityJust on the other side of Yangmingshan was Taipei, which was Taiwan's capital as well as the country's largest city
Looking back at the roadside stand right at the trailhead for the Qingshan WaterfallLooking back at the roadside stand right at the trailhead for the Qingshan Waterfall

Mom making her way up the steps as we left the food stand at the trailheadMom making her way up the steps as we left the food stand at the trailhead

After the initial climb, the trail flattened out somewhat as it now skirted a small plot of someone's farmAfter the initial climb, the trail flattened out somewhat as it now skirted a small plot of someone's farm

Looking back down the mountain towards the ocean, which was hard to see given how gray it was on this dayLooking back down the mountain towards the ocean, which was hard to see given how gray it was on this day

Roughly the first two-thirds of the hike followed along this concrete surface flanked by a ditchRoughly the first two-thirds of the hike followed along this concrete surface flanked by a ditch

The trail crossed the ditch every so oftenThe trail crossed the ditch every so often

Mom continuing along the well-defined trail that also followed along a ditchMom continuing along the well-defined trail that also followed along a ditch

Still hiking along the somewhat paved trail skirting alongside the ditch while the valley from the Laomei Stream continued to close inStill hiking along the somewhat paved trail skirting alongside the ditch while the valley from the Laomei Stream continued to close in

Mom still hiking along the ditchMom still hiking along the ditch

Mom approaching the part where the trail started to follow closely with the Laomei Stream while the ditch started to disappearMom approaching the part where the trail started to follow closely with the Laomei Stream while the ditch started to disappear

Mom crossing one of the bridges over a fork of the Laomei StreamMom crossing one of the bridges over a fork of the Laomei Stream

The Qingshan Waterfall Trail was now rockier and a bit rougher than the initial part that followed the ditchThe trail was now rockier and a bit rougher than the initial part that followed the ditch

Mom continuing along the rougher part of the trail skirting the Laomei StreamMom continuing along the rougher part of the trail skirting the Laomei Stream

One of the bouldering parts of the hike as we crossed a drier part of the Laomei StreamOne of the bouldering parts of the hike as we crossed a drier part of the Laomei Stream

Some parts of the trail still had older sections that might have seen damage from past floodsSome parts of the trail still had older sections that might have seen damage from past floods

Looking upstream from a bridge where we could finally start to see part of the Qingshan WaterfallLooking upstream from a bridge where we could finally start to see part of the Qingshan Waterfall

Mom on the final climb leading up to the viewing deck for the Qingshan WaterfallMom on the final climb leading up to the viewing deck for the falls

Mom made it to the viewing deck for the Qingshan WaterfallMom made it to the viewing deck for the falls

Mom approaching the part where the trail started to follow closely with the Laomei Stream while the ditch started to disappearMom approaching the part where the trail started to follow closely with the Laomei Stream while the ditch started to disappear

Context of the viewing deck fronting the Qingshan WaterfallContext of the viewing deck fronting the Qingshan Waterfall

Angled look at the Qingshan WaterfallAngled look at the Qingshan Waterfall

On the return hike, these were the first hikers that we encounteredOn the return hike, these were the first hikers that we encountered

Mom carefully descending the wet and slippery rocksMom descending the wet and slippery rocks

Following along the ditch-flanking part of the trail againFollowing along the ditch-flanking part of the trail again

Back at the small plot of farm landBack at the small plot of farm land

Mom making the final descent back down to the food stand at the trailhead as well as the car park further up the roadMom making the final descent back down to the food stand at the trailhead as well as the car park further up the road


[Back to top]

VIDEOS OF THE FALLS


Sweep starting with the rough (and closed) trail continuing beyond the falls before walking back to the main viewing deck for a more frontal look at the falls


[Back to top]

DRIVING DIRECTIONS

Since we made our visit to the Qingshan Waterfall from Keelung (基隆 [Jīlóng]), we'll make the recommended driving route from there. We'll spare you the unnecessary detours that our Taiwan GPS made us go on and give you the most direct route.

So from the junction of the Tai-2 Highway and the Tai-2甲 Highway (the character is pronounced "jiǎ") in Keelung, we drove north along the Tai-2 for about 15km before turning left at a light onto the Zhucaotan Road (豬槽潭路 [Zhūcáotán Lù]; also labeled as 北17 Road where the character is pronounced "běi" meaning "north"). Pay attention to this left turn because we missed it when we first got here, and we didn't recall seeing a sign for the Qingshan Waterfall going west on the Tai-2, but we did see it going east on the Tai-2 when we were backtracking.

Nevertheless, we would continue on the 北17 Road for the next 5km eventually reaching the well-signposted turnoff for the car park on our left as the road was climbing just past Qingshan Waterfall Trailhead, where there was a food stand. There were a couple of legal spots on the upper part of the car park, but there were more unpaved parking spaces further down the car park if the upper part was full. Overall, this drive would take us a little over an hour covering about 42km.

Finally, for some geographical context, Keelung was about 24km northeast of Taipei (臺北 or 台北 in simplified Chinese [Táiběi]; taking roughly 30 minutes using mostly the expressways). However, we also managed to make the 42km drive from Qingshan Waterfall to Taipei City (to return the rental car) though that wound up taking us nearly 2 hours due to the heavy congestion within Taipei City itself as this route was devoid of expressways.




[Back to top]

ITINERARIES

For more information about our itineraries involving this waterfall, check out the following links.




[Back to top]

MAP OF THE FALLS



Click here for the full World of Waterfalls map





[Back to top]

TRIP REPORTS

For more information about our experiences with this waterfall, check out the following travel stories.




[Back to top]

TRIP PLANNING RESOURCES


[Back to top]

NEARBY WATERFALLS




[Back to top]

RELATED PAGES



Have You Been To This Waterfall?

Share your experience!

Click here to see visitor comments for this waterfall

Click here to see visitor comments for other waterfalls that we've visited in this region

Click here to go to the Comments Main Page

You can use the form below, but if you find our host's interface too troublesome to use (especially if you're trying to upload photos), then just send a text submission anyways using the form, but also let us know that you'd like to attach photos. If you've provided an email address via the form, then we can reply back acknowledging your request, and you can then reply to that email with your photo attachments. We're very sorry about this, but there's not much we can do about SBI's terrible interface.



[Go to the Taiwan Waterfalls Page]

[Go to the Asia Page]


[Return from Qingshan Waterfall to the World of Waterfalls Home Page]