Purling Brook Falls

Springbrook National Park / Gold Coast Hinterland, Queensland, Australia

Rating: 3     Difficulty: 2
Purling Brook Falls
Purling Brook Falls (I've also seen it spelled as Purlingbrook Falls) was one of those waterfalls that Julie and I anticipated seeing prior to our visit. We knew from the pre-trip research that this was one of Queensland's taller waterfalls as it would dive some 100m off an escarpment into a well-forested base. The cliff-diving aspect of the falls made this one really stand out as the falls pretty didn't make any contact to its cliffs throughout almost all of its entire plunge. Apparently, we weren't the only ones who looked forward to coming here because we noticed it seemed to get many visitors, and this was probably due to the close proximity of the Gold Coast Hinterland to the populated Gold Coast itself.

Our experience with this waterfall consisted of doing half of a 4km circuit track. We started off by walking along the track following the cliff top to the top of Purling Brook Falls, where we managed to check out the falls from a lookout near its brink. From this vantage point, we were also able to look further downstream at the panorama of the lush rainforest below. This lookout was merely 200m from the car park.

Context of Purling Brook Falls from its brink showing the vertical cliffs it plunged off of Then, we swung back towards the car park as we continued along the cliffs affording us more angled views of the entirety of the waterfall while also letting us examine the bare cliff giving rise to the falls. Clearly, the cliff was too precipitous to allow foliage to grow on it, despite getting some of the spray from the waterfall when it would bend with the wind. The track continued to lead us away from the falls while eventually making its way into the lush rainforest below over a lone switchback plus some steps. There was a bridge that crossed over a creek that ended up being the brink of Tanninaba Falls.

As the track bent back towards the base of Purling Brook Falls, we then noticed the hidden Tanninaba Falls, which we couldn't see, but we were able to hear it loudly as its waters would crash within a crack in the cliffs that we couldn't immediately see from the track. It certainly wasn't a waterfall we could photograph, and we had to be content with its audible (as opposed to visual) presence.

Continuing downhill beyond the Tanninaba Falls, the track eventually led us right to the base of the impressive Purling Brook Falls. Like many of Australia's waterfalls, we noticed hints of basalt columns suggesting the volcanic origins of the area. But given the waterfall's somewhat light flow compared to some other photos I had seen in the literature (especially considering this area had a flood just a few months ago), I reckon this waterfall wouldn't last completely through the Dry Season (and maybe not even another month after our May 2008 visit). Indeed, this waterfall would probably perform best during the summer months of the Wet when monsoonal downpours would give the Little Nerang Creek a lot of life.

We were able to walk behind the impressively tall plunging waterfall as the track took advantage of the overhanging cliff that gave rise to the plunging characteristic of the falls in the first place. This overhanging property definitely suggested that the falls had been in the advanced stages of its formation (and certainly prone to receding further back from its present position). In any case, we couldn't proceed much further beyond the backside of the falls because there was a landslide that prevented further progress on the walking cicuit (undoubtedly caused by the flooding that occurred in the previous Summer just prior to our visit). Thus, we had to turn around and our hike went from a 4km walking loop into a 4km out-and-back return hike.

Directions: In our minds, the most straightforward route to get to Purling Brook Falls would be to start from the Gold Coast then work your way up to Springbrook National Park. Starting from Robina Towne Centre exit on the M1 (Pacific Motorway) in the Gold Coast, take the roundabout going right onto Regency Pl (note, I'm assuming you're going south on the M1). Then, at the next roundabout, take the first exit left onto Hwy 99 (starting off as Railway St then becoming the Gold Coast-Springbrook Rd). Follow Hwy 99 for just under 25km before turning left onto Forestry Rd, where there was a signpost leading us to the car park for the falls.

Julie and I actually came to this waterfall from the Natural Bridge (also part of Springbrook National Park). From there, we headed north on the Nerah-Murwillumbah Rd for 15km. Then, we turned right onto Pine Creek Rd and took it for about 7.2km before making another right onto Springbrook Rd. We then followed Springbrook Rd south for about 5km turning left onto Forestry Rd (there are signs here at this point). This turnoff led us to the proper car park.




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PHOTO JOURNAL
Full view of Purling Brook Falls with the morning sun shining on it before the clouds started showing up
Also in Springbrook National Park was the Natural Bridge, which was just a half-hour drive away from Purling Brook Falls
About 7km further south on Springbrook Road (Route 99) was the so-called Best-of-all Lookout yielding an expansive panorama looking to the ocean as well as across the border into New South Wales
Perhaps the nearest base for Springbrook National Park (including the Natural Bridge) was from the Gold Coast of which Surfer's Paradise (pictured here) was also a part of
Panoramic view of the rainforest looking downstream from the top of Purling Brook FallsPanoramic view of the rainforest looking downstream from the top of the falls

Looking towards the Purling Brook Falls from the other side of its topLooking towards the falls from the other side of its top

Looking down at Purling Brook Falls from the walking track leading to its baseLooking down at the falls from the walking track leading to its base

On the track to the base of Purling Brook FallsOn the track to the base of the falls

Julie continuing on the track to the base of Purling Brook Falls as it continued descending into the rainforestJulie continuing on the track to the base of the falls as it continued descending into the rainforest

Looking up at the unusual Tanninaba Falls, which we could hear but couldn't really seeLooking up at the unusual Tanninaba Falls, which we could hear but couldn't really see

Walking besides some interesting fig trees within the rainforest as we made our way to the base of Purling Brook FallsWalking besides some interesting fig trees within the rainforest as we made our way to the base of the falls

Julie approaching the base of Purling Brook FallsJulie approaching the base of Purling Brook Falls

Looking up at the Purling Brook Falls from its baseLooking up at the falls from its base

Julie checking out Purling Brook Falls from its backsideJulie checking out the falls from its backside

Looking across the base of Purling Brook Falls towards the landslide that prevented further progress on the walking circuitLooking across the base of the falls towards the landslide that prevented further progress on the walking circuit

As we were walking back to the car, we noticed more fig trees like this oneAs we were walking back to the car, we noticed more fig trees like this one

Looking over the top of Tanninaba FallsLooking over the top of Tanninaba Falls

Looking down at the context of Purling Brook Falls when the clouds started showing upLooking down at the context of the main falls when the clouds started showing up


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VIDEOS OF THE FALLS

Fixated on the falls from the top


Fixated on the falls from an overlook letting you see the entire thing


Bottom up sweep from the base of the falls to its top. Notice the basalt columns behind the falls.


Right to left sweep from behind the falls.


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MAP OF THE FALLS

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TRIP REPORTS
For more information about our experiences with this waterfall, check out the following travel stories.




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TRIP PLANNING RESOURCES



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NEARBY WATERFALLS


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Purlingbrook Falls 
I just wanted to add a shot I took of Purlingbrook Falls after recent heavy rain. Also, "Purlingbrook" is actually one word in the name of the falls, …

Purlingbrook Falls, Gold Coast, Australia in flood Feb 2012 Not rated yet
I took this shot after heavy floods on the Springbrook plateau in the gold coast hinterland. The power and sound of the falls was amazing.

Have a swim (Purling Brook Falls) Not rated yet
Just letting everyone know that after you walk under the falls (or just before depending which way you walked) there is an amazing swimming hole with …

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