Cascada de Linarejos

Cerrada del Utrero / Sierra de Cazorla / Andalucia Region, Jaen, Spain

Rating: 1     Difficulty: 2
Cascada de Linarejos

TABLE OF CONTENTS



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INTRODUCTION

The Cascada de Linarejos was our waterfalling excuse to check out the mountains of the Sierra de Cazorla. However, as you can see from the photo at the top of this page, this 60m tall waterfall wasn't doing too well. Although it doesn't seem like it in the photo, the waterfall was flowing, but in order to resolve the flow in photos, we had to zoom in enough to see its waterflow (see the photo journal further on in this page). That said, this was probably the easiest of the waterfalls to access in the Sierra de Cazorla area, and given how it appeared this part of Spain had already seen the last of its sustained rains at least over a month ago, this was the best that we could do under the circumstances. Indeed, this was one of those waterfalls where we needed to time our visit for right after a sustained rain (something we didn't have the luxury of doing when traveling here from abroad).

We started the hike to the Cascada de Linarejos from a road bridge over the Río Guadalquivir (see directions below. We then followed a trail that skirted alongside the rim of the gorge carved out by the river. This undulating path had railings in most of the spots that were exposed to dropoffs so we were fairly comfortable letting Tahia walk (holding her hand of course) while doing this trail.

For the first 400m of this undulating hike along the rim, we then started to hear the roar of a waterfall. The trail then started to descend into the gorge down a series of steps until we reached a dam that was releasing some of its water. Unfortunately, this was the source of the noise and so our hopes that the legitimate waterfall would be flowing well took a turn for the worse. Anyways, after walking alongside then below the dam, the trail then followed the base of the very tall cliffs flanking the Gorge of the Río Guadalquivir.

We encountered one Spanish family that was playing in the water amongst rocks at some small cascades downstream of the dam, but a short distance further from this area was the mirador along the trail looking across the gorge towards the Cascada de Linarejos. It appeared that there were some trails that might have crossed the river then went closer to the base of that waterfall with its plunge pool, but we didn't explore that option. This was also the turnaround point of our hike as we opted not to complete the longer loop hike. So we spent about 75 minutes away from the car though we went at a really slow pace given how hot it was during our visit (possibly between 35-40C). The literature indicated that the full loop hike was only 1.6km requiring a minimum of 45 minutes.




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PHOTO JOURNAL

The mountain-hugging town of Cazorla was the gateway to the Sierra de Cazorla natural area, where their picturesque mountains backed the attractive town as shown hereThe mountain-hugging town of Cazorla was the gateway to the Sierra de Cazorla natural area, where their picturesque mountains backed the attractive town as shown here
During our visit to the Cascada de Linarejos, we had based ourselves out of the town of Úbeda, which was said to be a UNESCO World Heritage town probably due to historical structures like theseDuring our visit to the Cascada de Linarejos, we had based ourselves out of the town of Úbeda, which was said to be a UNESCO World Heritage town probably due to historical structures like these
Not to be outdone, Baeza (like a sister town to Úbeda) was also a UNESCO World Heritage town for historical structures like the Fontana de Leones shown hereNot to be outdone, Baeza (like a sister town to Úbeda) was also a UNESCO World Heritage town for historical structures like the Fontana de Leones shown here
Roughly a 2.5-hour drive west of Úbeda was the city of Córdoba, which featured the amazing Mezquita (shown here). This strange blend of Muslim and Catholic architecture was on full display hereRoughly a 2.5-hour drive west of Úbeda was the city of Córdoba, which featured the amazing Mezquita (shown here). This strange blend of Muslim and Catholic architecture was on full display here
This was the small car park (as you can see there's not much room here) where we stopped the car and did the hike to the Cascada de LinarejosThis was the small car park (as you can see there's not much room here) where we stopped the car and did the hike to the Cascada de Linarejos

This was the cafe a little further up the road where I'd imagine if you couldn't find parking by the bridge over the Río Guadalquivir, then this would be where you'd park the carThis was the cafe a little further up the road where I'd imagine if you couldn't find parking by the bridge over the Río Guadalquivir, then this would be where you'd park the car

Looking over the Río Guadalquivir and its gorge from the bridge by the trailhead for Cascada de LinarejosLooking over the Río Guadalquivir and its gorge from the bridge by the trailhead

Here's a portrait view from the bridge over the Río Guadalquivir just to give you a sense of how deep this gorge really isHere's a portrait view from the bridge over the Río Guadalquivir just to give you a sense of how deep this gorge really is

Julie and Tahia following the trail skirting the rim of the gorge while providing a small amount of shade from the hot weatherJulie and Tahia following the trail skirting the rim of the gorge while providing a small amount of shade from the hot weather

Julie and Tahia continuing along the rim of the gorge. As you can see here, they had put up wooden railings to minimize the exposure to dropoffs. So we never really needed to wear the child carrier since Tahia was able to walk on this hikeJulie and Tahia continuing along the rim of the gorge. As you can see here, they had put up wooden railings to minimize the exposure to dropoffs. So we never really needed to wear the child carrier since Tahia was able to walk on this hike

Julie and Tahia going up some of the rocky steps as the undulating trail sometimes climbed and sometimes descended in short burstsJulie and Tahia going up some of the rocky steps as the undulating trail sometimes climbed and sometimes descended in short bursts

Perhaps this shot gives you a sense of how narrow the trail can be in some spotsPerhaps this shot gives you a sense of how narrow the trail can be in some spots

Closer look at some of the rocky steps we had to ascend while on the gorge rimCloser look at some of the rocky steps we had to ascend while on the gorge rim

Looking down at the dam responsible for the fake waterfall that caused the noise that we had heard while hiking along the gorge rimLooking down at the dam responsible for the fake waterfall that caused the noise that we had heard while hiking along the gorge rim

Looking upstream along the Río Guadalquivir towards a small dam overflowing some of its water to form this man-made waterfallLooking upstream along the Río Guadalquivir towards a small dam overflowing some of its water to form this man-made waterfall

We noticed this mountain goat while hiking within the gorge alongside the Río GuadalquivirWe noticed this mountain goat while hiking within the gorge alongside the Río Guadalquivir. This might indicate that the Sierra de Cazorla was protected enough that wildlife sightings weren't too rare

Looking upstream towards the dam. This was the spot where another Spanish family we encountered was cooling off from the hot weatherLooking upstream towards the dam. This was the spot where another Spanish family we encountered was cooling off from the hot weather

Julie and Tahia continuing along the base of the cliffs comprising the gorge of the Río GuadalquivirJulie and Tahia continuing along the base of the cliffs comprising the gorge of the Río Guadalquivir

Perhaps this photo gives you a look at just how tall the cliffs of the gorge really arePerhaps this photo gives you a look at just how tall the cliffs of the gorge really are

Our first look across the gorge towards the Cascada de LinarejosOur first look across the gorge towards the Cascada de Linarejos

Here's a zoomed-in look at the base of Cascada de Linarejos showing that indeed this waterfall was flowingHere's a zoomed-in look at the base of Cascada de Linarejos showing that indeed this waterfall was flowing

Zoomed in look at one of the upper tiers of the Cascada de Linarejos, again showing that we weren't kidding about this waterfall still clinging onto what's left of its flowZoomed in look at one of the upper tiers of the Cascada de Linarejos, again showing that we weren't kidding about this waterfall still clinging onto what's left of its flow

Looking up in the sky above the Cascada de Linarejos, where some soaring birds seemed to reinforce the wild nature of Sierra de CazorlaLooking up in the sky above the falls, where some soaring birds seemed to reinforce the wild nature of Sierra de Cazorla

Beyond the spots along the trail where we got to look across the gorge towards the Cascada de Linarejos, we could see that the trail kept going as shown here, which I'd imagine would ultimately form the 1.6km loop that we had known aboutBeyond the spots along the trail where we got to look across the gorge towards the falls, we could see that the trail kept going as shown here, which I'd imagine would ultimately form the 1.6km loop that we had known about

As we looked high up on the cliffs across the gorge, we noticed these caves where I'd imagine there might be some wildlife taking advantage of the natural shelterAs we looked high up on the cliffs across the gorge, we noticed these caves where I'd imagine there might be some wildlife taking advantage of the natural shelter

Julie and Tahia heading back up towards the damJulie and Tahia heading back up towards the dam

Walking up above the calm reservoir upstream from the damWalking up above the calm reservoir upstream from the dam

Julie and Tahia back up at the rim of the gorge as we hiked the final stretch back to the trailheadJulie and Tahia back up at the rim of the gorge as we hiked the final stretch back to the trailhead

Julie and Tahia finally making it back to the trailheadJulie and Tahia finally making it back to the trailhead


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VIDEOS OF THE FALLS


Examining the waterfall at low flow


sweeping around and getting a closer look at the man-made waterfall on the Guadalquivir River near the Cascada de Linarejos


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DRIVING DIRECTIONS

From Úbeda, we drove east on the N-322 to the town of Torreperogil, then we followed the A-315 to the southeast for about 22km to the town of Peal de Becerro, where we then hopped onto the A-319. We followed the A-319 further east into the town of Cazorla (after 13km) before continuing on the A-319 as it climbed up above Cazorla for the next 21km to the bridge spanning the Río Guadalquivir.

Right before that bridge, there was a tiny car park with room for probably four cars maximum (assuming they were parked in the right configuration, which you can see higher up in the photo journal). Otherwise, you'd have to backtrack for 100-200m or so to get to the cafe which has a much larger roadside pullout space for car parking.

This drive from Úbeda to the trailhead would probably take about 90 minutes in each direction. It took us about 45 minutes to get from Úbeda to Cazorla or vice versa.

For some additional context, Úbeda was 10km (under 30 minutes drive) east of Baeza, 146km (90 minutes drive) north of Granada, 150km (over 90 minutes drive) east of Córdoba, 281km (about 3 hours drive) east of Sevilla, and 315km (over 3 hours drive) south of Madrid.




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ITINERARIES

For more information about our itineraries involving this waterfall, check out the following links.




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MAP OF THE FALLS



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TRIP REPORTS

For more information about our experiences with this waterfall, check out the following travel stories.




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TRIP PLANNING RESOURCES






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NEARBY WATERFALLS




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RELATED PAGES



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