Beaver Falls

Olympic National Forest / near Forks / Clallam County, Washington, USA

Rating: 1.5     Difficulty: 1.5
Beaver Falls

TABLE OF CONTENTS



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INTRODUCTION

Beaver Falls was a waterfall we almost gave up on because we had trouble finding it and it was one of the more obscure waterfalls on our trip to the Olympic Peninsula. This obscurity was in part because there were no signs indicating its presence. This obscurity nearly conspired to compel us to give up earlier than if the waterfall was a more well-known attraction.

During heavy rain, we actually pulled over at a pair of pullouts before we luckily heard the sound of falling water at the second pullout. That second pullout turned out to be at the top of the falls so I suspected that the other pullout was the one that would take me closer to the base of the falls. Given the rain, I never bothered to entertain the notion of trying to get down to the base of the falls directly from its top. So in a way, the rain actually helped me find the correct path that led to the base of the falls.

Speaking of that scrambling path from the first pullout, it rained hard enough to cause an ephemeral stream that I was able to follow towards the scrambling path, which initially followed a guard rail before veering steeply down towards the creek. Even though it felt like I was scrambling down a stream that was cascading given the steepness of the terrain, there were enough footholds from the tree and the trail to make it down without too much risk to life and limb.

From down there, the view of the falls was satisfactory though I'd say this waterfall was probably more for waterfall collectors. It had a pretty short drop (maybe 30ft or so), but could potentially be as wide as 80ft when flooded. I happened to see it as a few segments biased to the left side of the escarpment, and I suspected this was more or less average flow considering it was raining hard during my visit. However, its base flow came from Beaver Lake which seemed to source this part of Beaver Creek.

The steep path to the base wasn't for everyone, but I felt it was doable as long as I took my time.




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PHOTO JOURNAL

Since Beaver Falls was the furthest waterfall to the west on the Olympic Peninsula that we visited, I figured this page would be as good as any to showcase this photo of Ruby Beach (a few miles south of Forks) and the enigmatic rock formations thereSince Beaver Falls was the furthest waterfall to the west on the Olympic Peninsula that we visited, I figured we ought to showcase Ruby Beach (a few miles south of Forks)
For Twilight fans, we also took a detour from a road just north of Forks towards a Native American Reservation at La Push, which featured this coastal scenery though we were here in bad weatherFor Twilight fans, we also took a detour from a road just north of Forks towards a Native American Reservation at La Push, which featured this coastal scenery though we were here in bad weather
On the way to the western side of the Olympic Peninsula, we drove by this large lake called Lake Crescent, where we caught this rainbow as the storm was calming downOn the way to the western side of the Olympic Peninsula, we drove by this large lake called Lake Crescent, where we caught this rainbow as the storm was calming down
Walking along the guardrail before the trail descends steeplyWalking along the guardrail before the trail descends steeply

The stream I followed to Beaver Falls' baseThe stream I followed to Beaver Falls' base

Looking back towards the unsigned pulloutLooking back towards the unsigned pullout


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VIDEOS OF THE FALLS


Fixated on the falls in motion


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DRIVING DIRECTIONS

We visited this waterfall while driving from Forks along the US101 towards Burnt Mountain Rd (Hwy 113) on the left. This turnoff is roughly 13 miles northeast of Forks or around 17 miles west of Fairholm.

Once on Burnt Mountain Rd, we headed north about 2 miles. The key is to look for a large pullout with a guardrail just north of the Beaver Creek Bridge. It might help to pay attention to the odometer because the correct pullout is not signed. If you make it to Beaver Lake, you went too far.

For context, Port Angeles was about 57 miles (over an hour drive) northeast of Forks and 82 miles (or 2.5 hours drive including a ferry ride [so it would take more time than this]) from Seattle.




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ITINERARIES

For more information about our itineraries involving this waterfall, check out the following links.




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MAP OF THE FALLS



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TRIP REPORTS

For more information about our experiences with this waterfall, check out the following travel stories.




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TRIP PLANNING RESOURCES





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NEARBY WATERFALLS




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RELATED PAGES



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