Morialta Waterfalls

Morialta Conservation Park / Mt Lofty Ranges / Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

Rating: 2     Difficulty: 2
The First Falls in Morialta Conservation Park

TABLE OF CONTENTS



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INTRODUCTION

The Morialta Waterfalls (or Morialta Falls) seemed to be one of the favourite spots for Adelaide locals and visitors alike, which was very evident on our latest visit there when the place was busy with weekenders. There was even a guide we met at Seal Bay on Kangaroo Island who (upon learning that we were into waterfalls) got nostalgic on us and said she would always come to the falls as a kid while growing up in the city. As you can see from the photo above, the popularity was with good reason as the falls dropped perhaps around 40m or so surrounded by picturesque red vertical cliffs in naturesque lands within a half-hour of local driving from the city centre (see directions below).

The Morialta Falls were actually a series of three significant waterfalls named First, Second, and Third Falls, respectively. The waterfall you see pictured above was the First Falls, and it was said to be the largest of the three. There were separate tracks joining in a loop that took in the Second and Third Falls as well as the top of the First Falls, but they were pretty much separate excursions from the much shorter and easier Morialta Falls Valley Walk. For the purposes of this writeup, we're just focusing on the Morialta Falls Valley Walk since that was the only track we've done in our visits here. In case you're curious, the Three Falls Grand Hike (on the Morialta Falls Plateau) was said to be a 7.3km loop hike requiring about 3.5 hours.

As alluded to earlier, Julie and I actually made multiple visits to this waterfall. On the first time we showed up back in November 2006, it was dry as it didn't stand a chance against a severe multi-year drought that gripped all of Southeastern Australia for much of the decade. Our latest visit in November 2017 was in the midst of Spring though the last heavy rainfall was probably at least a month prior to our visit. Thus, I'd imagine this waterfall would be best experienced in the Winter and Spring months depending on when the last significant rainfall had occurred as well as how much cumulative precipitation had fallen that season or year.

According to the park signs, the origin of the name of the falls was apparently a bastardization of the word Moriatta in the Kaurna Aboriginal language. It was said to mean something like "ever-flowing creek", which might have been the state of Fourth Creek when the first peoples inhabited this area. The creek no longer has perennial flow due to dams and bores that were built since the advent of European settlement since the 1840s. Since Fourth Creek was the watercourse responsible for the waterfalls here, this also meant that they once had perennial flow before European intervention.

As for the visit itself, from the Morialta Falls car park, we followed a well-developed, well-signed, and mostly gravel track meandered on a mostly flat or gradual slope in a wide valley. Initially, the valley was wide and the track was flanked by some bush and trees, including some taller white-barked eucalyptus trees. While we encountered some colorful birds along the track, Julie and I were fortunate enough to see koalas on some of these gum trees the first time we were here back in 2006.

The track also gently weaved its way alongside and over Fourth Creek. Given that this was the creek responsible for the Morialta Waterfalls, then it would be a good sign that the waterfall will have life if you happen to see the creek flowing alongside the trail. Anyways, the further along the track we went, the more the valley walls closed in. Soon, we found ourselves walking amongst impressive reddish cliffs hinting at the geological forces that gave rise to the waterfalls here. There was even a spur trail going up steps to the Giant's Cave, which was one of the accessible (albeit small) caves in the area though we noticed many more caves perched high up on other cliffs in the distance.

Eventually, the track became a boardwalk as it ultimately dead-ended at the lookout for the First Falls. Even though the view from the lookout was good enough to get nice pictures, we did see other folks get past the railings and cool off near the plunge pool by the base of the falls. In any case, the signage suggested that the round trip hiking time was 45 minutes to do the 1.6km out-and-back walk, but we spent closer to 90 minutes so we could relax, take our time, and even check out the Giant's Cave. That said, there were clearly other options for extending the excursion as numerous trails branched off throughout the Morialta Valley Walk (such as the Three Falls Grand Loop, which we'll have to do one of these days when the conditions and timing are right).

Finally, if you happened to get a late start (like on the first time we did this hike back in November 2006), we had to keep an eye on our watches and the skies the whole time because the park gates were said to close 15 minutes before sunset. So on that first visit, we started our hike at 6pm. Thus, we didn't have the luxury of getting sidetracked as we worked to avoid getting locked in.




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PHOTO JOURNAL

Morialta Conservation Park was about 10km northeast of the Adelaide CBD, which was where we were based for our brief time in South AustraliaMorialta Conservation Park was about 10km northeast of the Adelaide CBD, which was where we were based for our brief time in South Australia
Morialta Conservation Park was part of the Adelaide Hills, which also encompassed Mt Lofty. The summit of that mountain revealed a nice panorama of Adelaide looking towards the Southern OceanMorialta Conservation Park was part of the Adelaide Hills, which also encompassed Mt Lofty. The summit of that mountain revealed a nice panorama of Adelaide looking towards the Southern Ocean
A really cool benefit of visiting the waterfalls in the Morialta Conservation Park was seeing koalas, which was something that we didn't expect to findA really cool benefit of visiting the waterfalls in the Morialta Conservation Park was seeing koalas, which was something that we didn't expect to find
Roughly 2 hours drive plus a ferry ride was Kangaroo Island, where we visited the Australian Sea Lions at the picturesque Seal BayRoughly 2 hours drive plus a ferry ride was Kangaroo Island, where we visited the Australian Sea Lions at the picturesque Seal Bay
On our second visit to Morialta Falls, we actually had to park in one of the further marked lots because the nearest ones were fullOn our second visit to Morialta Falls, we actually had to park in one of the further marked lots because the nearest ones were full

Even from the road to the trailhead, we could see that Fourth Creek had water, which was a very good sign that the waterfall was going to flowEven from the road to the trailhead, we could see that Fourth Creek had water, which was a very good sign that the waterfall was going to flow

Early in the hike, we encountered this sign indicating what would be required to see the other waterfalls.  That Grand Waterfall Loop was a bit too long for our situationEarly in the hike, we encountered this sign indicating what would be required to see the other waterfalls. That Grand Waterfall Loop was a bit too long for our situation

Hiking to the Second and Third Falls required climbing out of the gorge and hiking along its rim, thus that track immediately started climbing up stepsHiking to the Second and Third Falls required climbing out of the gorge and hiking along its rim, thus that track immediately started climbing up steps

We weren't kidding about them threatening to lock you in if you're not outta here by closing timeSee? We weren't kidding about them threatening to lock you in if you're not outta here by closing time

Julie on the very wide and well-developed track to the first of the Morialta Waterfalls surrounded by white-barked gum trees and other native floraJulie on the very wide and well-developed track to the first of the Morialta Waterfalls surrounded by white-barked gum trees and other native flora

The further we went on the Morialta Valley Walk, the more the cliffs were closing inThe further we went on the Morialta Valley Walk, the more the cliffs were closing in

Around the half-way point of the Morialta Valley Walk, we encountered this detour leading up to the Giant's CaveAround the half-way point of the Morialta Valley Walk, we encountered this detour leading up to the Giant's Cave

Julie and I spent a few minutes hiking up to the Giant's Cave, which happened to be one of several caves in the valleyJulie and I spent a few minutes hiking up to the Giant's Cave, which happened to be one of several caves in the valley

Just a short distance higher up past the Giant's Cave was this lookout over the Morialta ValleyJust a short distance higher up past the Giant's Cave was this lookout over the Morialta Valley

Julie staying on the Morialta Valley Walk on the right of this fork, but clearly there were many opportunities to deviate from the main track and climb up to the plateau to extend this excursion and see other attractions in the areaJulie staying on the Morialta Valley Walk on the right of this fork, but clearly there were many opportunities to deviate from the main track and climb up to the plateau to extend this excursion and see other attractions in the area

Besides Giant's Cave, we noticed that there were other caves in the distanceBesides Giant's Cave, we noticed that there were other caves in the distance

Julie about to round a bend beneath tall red cliffs that had closed in on the valley just as we were getting near the first of the Morialta WaterfallsJulie about to round a bend beneath tall red cliffs that had closed in on the valley just as we were getting near the first of the Morialta Waterfalls

Julie approaching the first of the Morialta WaterfallsJulie approaching the first of the Morialta Waterfalls

Some people hopped the railings and got closer to the Morialta Falls to cool off.  This photo shows how big the falls was as it towered over these weekendersSome people hopped the railings and got closer to the Morialta Falls to coll off. This photo shows how big the falls was as it towered over these weekenders

As you can see in this photo, the first of the Morialta Waterfalls spilled over a giant step in the gorge, which meant that there was no further progress on the valley walk. This was why visiting the Second and Third Falls required a separate hike that climbed out of the valley and onto the plateauAs you can see in this photo, the first of the Morialta Waterfalls spilled over a giant step in the gorge, which meant that there was no further progress on the valley walk. This was why visiting the Second and Third Falls required a separate hike that climbed out of the valley and onto the plateau

When we finally made it to the First Falls (Morialta Falls), we were disappointed to see it was dry back in November 2006When we finally made it to the First Falls (Morialta Falls), we were disappointed to see it was dry back in November 2006

Julie starting to make her way back to the car parkJulie starting to make her way back to the car park

On our way out of the park on that first visit back in November 2006 (when we realized that we could walk out with a little less haste before the gates closed), we noticed some koalas on the trees above usOn our way out of the park on that first visit back in November 2006 (when we realized that we could walk out with a little less haste before the gates closed), we noticed some koalas on the trees above us

Spring was a good time to see wildflowers like these in bloom alongside the Morialta Valley WalkSpring was a good time to see wildflowers like these in bloom alongside the Morialta Valley Walk

We didn't get to see koalas along the track on our second visit to Morialta Falls, but we did see these colorful parrot-looking birdsWe didn't get to see koalas along the track on our second visit to Morialta Falls, but we did see these colorful parrot-looking birds

Back at the trailhead and now walking along the road towards our parked carBack at the trailhead and now walking along the road towards our parked car


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VIDEOS OF THE FALLS


Sweep around the base of the First Falls while examining the surrounding cliffs


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DRIVING DIRECTIONS

The Morialta Waterfalls and Conservation Park was on the eastern outskirts of Adelaide in the Adelaide Hills. There are many ways of getting here, but we'll describe our route from the Adelaide CBD.

First, we made our way towards Magill Road, which could be reached via the A11 on North Terrace Rd / Botanic Rd (we actually got there via Pirie St, Bartels Rd, Flinders St, then Fullarton Rd). Once on the Magill Rd, we continued heading east for about 5.5km before turning left onto Norton Summit Rd.

We then followed Norton Summit Rd for a little over 450m before turning left onto Glen Stuart Rd and following that residential road for a little over 1km. Then, we turned right at the roundabout onto Morialta Rd and followed it for roughly 600m before turning right at the signposted entrance to the Morialta Falls and Conservation Park. We followed this road for about 1.3km to its end.

Since we showed up at a pretty busy time of the morning on a Saturday, we actually had to find parking a little further back from the end of the road, which extended the overall walk. In any case, it took us around 35 minutes to make this drive with stoplights and some mild traffic.




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ITINERARIES

For more information about our itineraries involving this waterfall, check out the following links.




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MAP OF THE FALLS



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TRIP REPORTS

For more information about our experiences with this waterfall, check out the following travel stories.




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TRIP PLANNING RESOURCES




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NEARBY WATERFALLS




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What Other Visitors Have Said

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Stuart William Walker 
Sadly I only have bad news on the falls. When I was a kid of eleven back in 1972, my best friend Stuart Walker was trying to climb down at Morialta …

Morialta Falls 
The walk from the car park to the base of the falls takes around 15 to 20 minutes, has a slight gradient all the way, and is very enjoyable in all seasons. …

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