World of Waterfalls Blog

This page displays all of our blog posts (latest posts first).

The blog posts shown here include both non-waterfall and waterfall writeups.  So in addition to our in-depth waterfall posts, the article/post topics can range from educational writeups, musings, features, advice, product reviews, and more.

This page even displays updates or new postings pertaining to Top 10 Lists, Itineraries, and Trip Reports.

If you’re looking for waterfall writeups, you can find them in our Destinations page.

Most recent blog posts (reverse chronological order):

Cascate del Mulino

Cascate del Mulino is perhaps Italy’s most famous hot springs waterfall, and it certainly opened our eyes to a different side of Tuscany after our visit.

“Tahia’s Italian Audible” (Italy – November 15, 2023 to November 25, 2023)

And I couldn’t believe that GoogleMaps was now routing us into the ZTL of Florence as we made our way towards the Florence Airport. Why did the GPS insist…

Northern Japan Road Trip Itinerary – July 3, 2023 to July 27, 2023

Our Northern Japan Itinerary covered a 25-day period that started in Osaka, went as far as Shiretoko, and looped back to Osaka via Mt Fuji.

Northeast Taiwan Itinerary – June 27, 2023 to July 3, 2023

Our Summer 2023 Taiwan Itinerary covered a one-week period focusing on the northeast of the island mixing family with touristy stuff.

All Around Korea Itinerary – June 7, 2023 to June 27, 2023

Our Korea Itinerary covered a 20-day touring period where we fit in as much as we could going all around the Korean Peninsula and Jeju Island.

Top 10 Best Waterfalls in Korea & How To Visit Them

The Top 10 Best Korea Waterfalls List showcases our favorite waterfalls that we’ve personally visited in South Korea, including Jeju Island.

Hossawa Waterfall (hossawa-no-taki [払沢の滝])

Hossawa Waterfall (払沢の滝; Hossawa Falls) was the Tokyo Prefecture’s only entry in Japan’s Top 100 Waterfalls List by the Ministry of the Environment in 1990.

Jinba Waterfall (jinba-no-taki [陣馬の滝])

Jinba Waterfall (陣馬の滝; Jinba Falls) was a wide spring-fed waterfall at the start of the Gotomeki River near Mt Fuji, which was a fun place to cool off.

Choshigataki Waterfall (choshigataki [銚子ケ滝])

Choshigataki Waterfall (銚子ケ滝; Choshigataki Falls) was a 48m waterfall with a shape that pretty much resembled a sake decanter (as its name would suggest).

Tatsuzawa Fudo Waterfall (tatsuzawa-fudo-no-taki [達沢不動滝])

Tatsuzawa Fudo Waterfall (達沢不動滝; Tatsuzawa Fudo Falls) was a popular pairing of “male” and “female” falls on the southwestern end of the Adatara Mountains.

Otsuji Waterfall (otsujigataki [乙字ケ滝])

Otsuji Waterfall (乙字ケ滝; Otsujiga Falls) spreads across the Abukuma River with a horseshoe-shaped brink that has been called Sukagawa’s Mini Niagara Falls.

Namekawa Waterfall (namegawa-otaki [滑川大滝])

Namekawa Waterfall (滑川大滝; Namekawa Falls) was perhaps the largest waterfall in the Tohoku Region, but it’s also one of the more unique waterfalls in Japan.

Sekiyama Waterfall (sekiyama-otaki [関山大滝])

Sekiyama Waterfall (関山大滝; Sekiyama Falls) was a gushing roadside waterfall that was located between Sendai and Yamagata said to be 10m tall and 15m wide.

Fudo Waterfall (fudo-no-taki [不動の滝])

The Hachimantai Fudo Waterfall (不動の滝; Fudo Falls) was a 15m waterfall that once was a training ground for practioners of Shugendo (a religion in Japan).

Chidorigataki Waterfall (chidorigataki [千鳥ヶ滝])

Chidorigataki Waterfall (千鳥ヶ滝; Chidorigataki Falls) was kind of a road trip waterfall as it seemed to be ideally situated to take a break from a long drive.

Kumagoe Waterfall (kumagoe-no-taki [熊越の滝])

Kumagoe Waterfall (熊越の滝; Kumagoe Falls) was a hidden and obscure waterfall east of Shiretoko Pass near the Rausu Visitor Center offering a primitive hike.

Shigure Waterfall (shiguretaki [時雨滝])

Shigure Waterfall (時雨滝; Shigure Falls) was a conspicuous roadside geothermal-heated waterfall situated on the northern end Utoro on Shiretoko’s West Coast.

Seseki Waterfall (seseki-no-taki [セセキの滝])

Seseki Waterfall (セセキの滝; Seseki Falls) was a rather obscure but tall seaside waterfall spilling into a sleepy village on the eastern coast of Shiretoko.

Sakura Waterfall (sakura-no-taki [さくらの滝])

Sakura Waterfall (さくらの滝; Sakura Falls) was a small but very interesting 3.7m high waterfall on the Shari River, where we witnessed our first salmon run.

Yamabiko Waterfall (yamabiko-no-taki [山彦の滝])

Yamabiko Waterfall (山彦の滝; Yamabiko Falls) was a 28m tall waterfall letting you go behind it for an unusual “backwards” view. Sometimes it’s lit up at night.