Crystal Mill Waterfall

Marble / Schofield / Crested Butte, Colorado, USA

About Crystal Mill Waterfall


Hiking Distance: 7.6 miles round trip (from Schofield Park)
Suggested Time: 5-6 hours

Date first visited: 2020-10-17
Date last visited: 2020-10-17

Waterfall Latitude: 39.05898
Waterfall Longitude: -107.10476

Waterfaller Newsletter

Get over the hump of the mid-week blues! Subscribe and get exclusive curated content delivered to your inbox every Wednesday.

The Crystal Mill Waterfall was basically the short 15ft waterfall on the Crystal River situated right next to the famous Crystal Mill.

This “mill” was actually historically a powerhouse where the waterfall was held up by a dam so the hydropower could serve a couple of silver mines as well as the town of Crystal.

Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_070_iPhone_10172020 - Full context of the Crystal Mill and the adjacent Crystal Mill Waterfall situated beneath some Autumn colors beyond the peak of the foliage season
Full context of the Crystal Mill and the adjacent Crystal Mill Waterfall situated beneath some Autumn colors beyond the peak of the foliage season

This structure was built in 1892, but it shut down when the mines no longer became profitable in 1917, and eventually it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1985.

As you can see in the photo above, it was the idyllic setting and rustic appearance of the “mill” that made this perhaps Colorado’s most photographed historic relic.

My mid-October 2020 visit happened to have occurred just past the peak of the Fall colors, but there were still a handful of aspens across from the mill that held onto their leaves.

Yet despite the popularity of the Crystal Mill (especially given its Instagram explosion in recent years), accessing this site requires a bit of planning.

Options for Visiting the Crystal Mill

Marble_097_10182020 - The main road through the sleepy town of Marble
The main road through the sleepy town of Marble

Most of the people who visit the Crystal Mill do so from the town of Marble, which itself featured some interesting relics and sites revolving around its namesake marble.

That said, the town was easily accessible from the Hwy 133 and the CO-6, and thus it would be the more convenient starting point to access the Crystal Mill whether by high clearance 4wd vehicle or by hiking that road.

I’ve been told by a ranger patrolling the Crystal Mill that the road between Marble and Crystal was “non-technical” though bumpy with rocks, which would test most stock high-clearance vehicles and their tires.

We have attempted to book a jeep tour from Marble to access the mill, but they were closed for the season when we inquired in October.

Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_557_10172020 - The familiar view of the famous Crystal Mill from behind the rope barricades
The familiar view of the famous Crystal Mill from behind the rope barricades

Nevertheless, it was possible to hike to the Crystal Mill from Marble, which would be between 9-10 miles round trip depending on whether the hike began from as close as Lizard Lake or as far back as Beaver Lake or even Marble itself.

Aside from the descent from Lizard Lake to the Crystal River, most of this hike would be relatively flat.

However, given the amount of vehicular traffic that drives this stretch of the CO-3 towards the Crystal Mill, it can be a very dusty experience for hikers.

When you consider how breathing in the fine dust particles can tax the lungs (as they settle in the lungs and stay there), one can argue that this option would not be any easier than a high altitude hike under cleaner air.

Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_375_10172020 - Looking towards what I believe to be Whitehouse Mountain from the 'ghost town' of Crystal
Looking towards what I believe to be Whitehouse Mountain from the ‘ghost town’ of Crystal

Speaking of the high altitude hike under cleaner air, the other option to access the Crystal Mill was to hike from Schofield Park down to the Crystal Mill via the Devils Punch Bowl and Crystal.

This was the hike that I did, and it wound up being about 7.6 miles round-trip with around 1300ft elevation loss (and gain on the way back up) according to my GPS logs.

It took me nearly 6 hours to complete though a pretty solid hour of that time was spent taking pictures, especially at the Crystal Mill.

The rest of this write-up focuses on this hike to Crystal Mill from Schofield Park (see directions below), which had the benefit of far less 4wd traffic despite the brutal upside-down elevation profile.

Crystal Mill Waterfall Trail Description from Schofield Park

Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_102_10172020 - Julie traversing the 'Bridge to Terabithia', which was a makeshift bridge to allow descending the Schofield Pass Road without needing to ford the South Fork Crystal River
Julie traversing the ‘Bridge to Terabithia’, which was a makeshift bridge to allow descending the Schofield Pass Road without needing to ford the South Fork Crystal River

Assuming we began our hike from Schofield Park, we’d essentially descend from there along the 4wd Schofield Pass Road towards the “ghost town” of Crystal and eventually the Crystal Mill.

There are actually a couple of ways to do this hike – one involving going through two fords of the South Fork Crystal River and another that stays dry via the “Bridge to Terabithia”.

The stretch of the hike between Schofield Park and the Devils Punch Bowl is covered in detail in this waterfall write-up.

However, this only covers the first 1.3 miles of the hike (or 2.6 miles round-trip), and there’s still another 2.5 miles (or 5 miles more round-trip) to go.

Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_269_10172020 - Context of the Devils Punch Bowl and the road bridge on the rugged Schofield Pass Road, which I ultimately took to Crystal and the Crystal Mill
Context of the Devils Punch Bowl and the road bridge on the rugged Schofield Pass Road, which I ultimately took to Crystal and the Crystal Mill

Beyond the road bridge near the Devils Punch Bowl, the Schofield Pass Road continued to descend steeply as the canyon gradually opened up.

Along this part of the descent, I continued to notice tumbling cascades on the South Fork Crystal River.

I also appreciated the narrowness of the shelf road, which would be quite the challenge to stay on without sliding into the ravine nor scraping against the cliffs in a wider 4wd vehicle.

Anyways, I continued descending the rocky Schofield Pass Road, which still defied what I thought was reasonably possible to drive (though I’m not an experienced overlander so what do I know?).

Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_288_10172020 - The continuation of the Schofield Pass Road beyond the Devils Punch Bowl as it resumed its steep descent towards the Crystal Canyon and the merging of the South Fork and North Fork of the Crystal Rivers
The continuation of the Schofield Pass Road beyond the Devils Punch Bowl as it resumed its steep descent towards the Crystal Canyon and the merging of the South Fork and North Fork of the Crystal Rivers

The further down I went, the more I started to notice Crystal Peak and the valley that would ultimately contain both Crystal and the Crystal Mill.

Towards the bottom of the descent, there was a signed turnoff leading to the Lead King Basin on the right, but I kept left to continue towards Crystal and eventually Marble.

After a little over 2 miles from the Devils Punch Bowl, I then entered the “ghost town” of Crystal, which was situated in a somewhat open clearing flanked on one side by a lot of aspens.

Beyond Crystal, the road eventually veered another quarter-mile or so before reaching another wide section of the road directly opposite the Crystal River from the Crystal Mill.

Crystal Mill Waterfall Paid Access

Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_400_10172020 - Context of the roped barricade and the boulder where I paid the $10 to go beyond this barricade to get down to the banks of the Crystal River
Context of the roped barricade and the boulder where I paid the $10 to go beyond this barricade to get down to the banks of the Crystal River

At the Crystal Mill lookout area, there was a roped off “fence” preventing most people from going any closer to the banks of the Crystal River.

So this only yielded a view of the Crystal Mill itself but not of the waterfall adjacent to it, and this suited the majority of visitors just fine.

However, with a $10 cash payment to the patrolling ranger there (and signing a waiver), I was able to go past the rope next to a boulder fronting a steep and eroded path.

This finally led down to the banks of the Crystal River right at the waterfall’s plunge pool.

Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_420_10172020 - View of the Crystal Mill Waterfall and the mill itself during the descent to the banks of the Crystal River
View of the Crystal Mill Waterfall and the mill itself during the descent to the banks of the Crystal River

The only thing that the ranger asked of my visit was to not cross the Crystal River.

I’d magine that he said that so there would be no temptation to get closer to the Crystal Mill and risk further damage to it besides the effects of weathering.

During my mid-October 2020 visit, most of the Autumn foliage was gone except for a tree above the waterfall and opposite the mill.

That said, I was also alone during my midday visit for nearly an hour before a handful of other people joined me.

Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_544_10172020 - Context of a few people who joined me at the banks of the Crystal River while I started to make my way back up to Schofield Park
Context of a few people who joined me at the banks of the Crystal River while I started to make my way back up to Schofield Park

After having my fill of the Crystal Mill, then I went back the way I came from Schofield Park, which meant I had to gain back 1300ft of elevation in nearly 4 miles.

Even though this was a far less-traveled way of accessing the Crystal Mill, I found it to be more rewarding, especially since it included a visit to the Devils Punch Bowl as well as being subject to less motorized traffic (and the dust kicked up from them).

Authorities

The Crystal Mill Waterfall resides near the “ghost town” of Crystal, which itself was near the towns of Marble and Crested Butte in Gunnison County, Colorado. As of this writing, it is privately owned and administered by the Crystal Mill Foundation though it’s apparently in the process of being sold. For information or inquiries about the area as well as current conditions, visit their website as well as this page from the National Forest Service.

Schofield_Pass_Rd_012_iPhone_10172020 - Beyond Gothic and the Judd Falls Trailhead, the road became known as the Schofield Pass Road, which was still part of the Crystal Mills adventure from Crested Butte
Schofield_Pass_Rd_016_iPhone_10172020 - Just before reaching Emerald Lake, the Schofield Pass Road approached a pretty narrow and scary-looking shelf where you definitely wouldn't want to fall off the road!
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_845_10172020 - Looking back at the Emerald Lake near Schofield Pass
Schofield_Pass_Rd_039_iPhone_10172020 - These heavily-stickered signs were the only indications that we had reached Schofield Pass while driving the Schofield Pass Road. This was the view looking back at those signs (as if we were heading back to Crested Butte)
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_027_10172020 - Right before parking at the Schofield Park trailhead, we spotted this bushy-tailed fox, which was definitely wildlife that I had never seen before
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_040_10172020 - This was the ominous yellow sign by the parking area at Schofield Park
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_844_10172020 - Looking back at the parking area at Schofield Park, which was way busier in the afternoon than it was when we first showed up first thing in the morning
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_058_10172020 - Julie looking at the first ford of the South Fork Crystal River, which would be a challenge to stay dry on if it was flowing higher
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_065_10172020 - Looking upstream from the first fording obstacle towards this intermediate waterfall that many had mistaken to be the Devil's Punch Bowl
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_103_10172020 - This was the 'Bridge to Terabithia' sign near the makeshift bridge that allowed us to stay dry without needing to cross any fords of the South Fork Crystal River over the Schofield Pass Road
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_121_10172020 - Looking down into a small valley as the single-track trail descended right into it during our pursuit of Devils Punch Bowl
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_126_10172020 - Context of Julie making the steep descent from the ridge into the small valley on the opposite side of the South Fork Crystal River
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_133_10172020 - The single-track trail about to rejoin the Schofield Pass Road on the other side of the second ford of the South Fork Crystal River
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_013_iPhone_10172020 - Julie descending into the steep canyon containing the Devils Punch Bowl
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_177_10172020 - Looking down over the pair of drops and plunge pools comprising the Devils Punch Bowl
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_183_10172020 - Context of Julie continuing to descend the Schofield Pass Road to get a more frontal viewing angle of the Devils Punch Bowl
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_205_10172020 - The lower we descended on the Schofield Pass Road, the more we started to see the Devils Punch Bowl
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_274_10172020 - Beyond the Devils Punch Bowl, the Schofield Pass Road continues its steep descent towards Crystal
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_281_10172020 - This was one of the side waterfalls on the South Fork Crystal River downstream of the Devils Punch Bowl
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_294_10172020 - Following along the narrow shelf downhill from the Devils Punch Bowl en route to Crystal
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_300_10172020 - During my mid-October 2020 hike down from Devils Punch Bowl towards Crystal, there were still some pockets of Fall colors along the Schofield Pass Road
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_314_10172020 - Framed look towards what I believe to be Whitehorse Mountain between some remnant Autumn foliage that was past their peak
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_321_10172020 - Passing by one of the more vibrant aspens that remained during my hike down from Schofield Park to Crystal
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_348_10172020 - This was the signed road junction for the Lead King Basin on the right, but the descending road on the left continued towards Crystal
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_349_10172020 - Looking towards a partially-fallen-over sign with stickers on them pointing the way to both Crested Butte and Lead King Basin
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_353_10172020 - Looking towards what I think to be the Whitehorse Mountain in the canyon containing the Crystal Mill as I was descending closer to it
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_381_10172020 - Looking back at the small 'ghost town' of Crystal on the way down to the Crystal Mill
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_385_10172020 - There were still some remnant Fall colors in the vicinity of Crystal Mill, which bode welll for taking colorful pictures of the iconic relic
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_390_10172020 - My first look at the impressive Crystal Mill even though the aspens behind it were bare
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_403_10172020 - Descending towards the banks of the Crystal River for a closer view of the Crystal Mill and its waterfall
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_430_10172020 - Another contextual look at the Crystal Mill with waterfall and some hint of Fall colors
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_439_10172020 - Looking across the colorful and clear plunge pool beneath the Crystal Mill Waterfall towards the Crystal Mill itself
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_453_10172020 - View of the Crystal Mill, the Crystal Mill Waterfall, and the last of the Autumn foliage from a little further downstream along the Crystal River
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_470_10172020 - Focused look at just the Crystal Mill and the Crystal Mill Waterfall from the fringe of the plunge pool on the Crystal River
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_472_10172020 - High contrast ook at the Crystal Mill and Crystal Mill Waterfall from the banks of the Crystal River
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_477_10172020 - Looking across the clear plunge pool beneath the Crystal Mill Waterfall towards the iconic Crystal Mill
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_525_10172020 - Contextual look back at the Crystal Mill from further downstream along the Crystal River
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_548_10172020 - Looking back at the Crystal Mill and plunge pool as I was headed back up to the sanctioned part of the 4wd road on my way back up to Schofield Park
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_573_10172020 - Looking back at the context of the road and viewing area around the Crystal Mill
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_582_10172020 - Checking out one of the cabins backed by Fall colors in the 'ghost town' of Crystal
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_589_10172020 - Starting to leave Crystal and embark on the brutal long climb back up to Schofield Park
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_600_10172020 - On the long climb back up the Schofield Pass Road en route to Schofield Park from Crystal
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_607_10172020 - Looking towards some cascade tumbling across the South Fork Crystal River from somewhere beneath what I believe to be Treasury Mountain
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_616_10172020 - More focused look at what I believe to be Treasury Mountain, which seemed to have a small glacier still beside it
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_617_10172020 - Climbing up some very rocky stretches of the Schofield Pass Road while still climbing between Crystal and Devils Punch Bowl
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_629_10172020 - Ascending back up to the remaining groves of aspens that still have their colorful leaves during my mid-October 2020 visit from the Crystal Mill
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_638_10172020 - Looking back at some kind of interesting pinnacle fronted by some remnant Autumn colors seen while I was ascending the Schofield Pass Road back towards Schofield Park
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_645_10172020 - Approaching the narrowing of the canyon where the Devils Punch Bowl was located
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_677_10172020 - Even though it was early afternoon, I found it interesting to still see icicles on hanging from deadfalls on the South Fork Crystal River as I was continuing to hike back to towards Devils Punch Bowl and eventually Schofield Park
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_679_10172020 - Passing through the narrowest parts of the canyon as I was getting closer to the Devils Punch Bowl on the way back up to Schofield Park
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_750_10172020 - Finally making it back to the Devils Punch Bowl on the way back up to Schofield Park
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_777_10172020 - The very rough and rocky ascent on the Schofield Pass Road near the Devils Punch Bowl. I couldn't believe that people could drive this road!
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_781_10172020 - Afternoon look back down at the Devils Punch Bowl as I was headed back up to Schofield Park
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_784_10172020 - Waiting for a couple of souped up jeeps making their way slowly down the really rough and dangerous part of the Schofield Pass Road right above the Devils Punch Bowl
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_788_10172020 - Looking closely at the first jeep that needed all of its generous clearance and rugged tires to get through the really rocky sections of the Schofield Pass Road next to Devils Punch Bowl
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_789_10172020 - Looking down at the last of the jeeps slowly making its way down the Schofield Pass Road around the Devils Punch Bowl
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_794_10172020 - Continuing the long climb up from Devils Punch Bowl, which caused me to be quite winded at this point given the distance, the elevation gain, and combining all that with the high elevation
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_804_10172020 - Looking at some cascades among the rocky debris upstream of the Devils Punch Bowl on the South Fork Crystal River as I ascended the Schofield Pass Road
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_813_10172020 - Approaching a choke point on the Schofield Pass Road that I'd imagine would be very tricky for wide 4wd vehicles to get through
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_820_10172020 - Back at the second ford of the South Fork Crystal River, but it was low enough that I was able to head back on the Schofield Pass Road without getting the insides of my boots wet
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_832_10172020 - Making it back to the first of the fords over the South Fork Crystal River
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_835_10172020 - Early afternoon look upstream at the first of the fords of the South Fork Crystal River on my way back up to Schofield Park
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_838_10172020 - Hiking back up the rocky terrain of the Schofield Pass Road near the end of the out-and-back hike to Devils Punch Bowl and beyond
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_841_10172020 - The final stretch of the long out-and-back hike from Schofield Park to Crystal Mill and back
Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_844_10172020 - Finally returning to the parking area at Schofield Park to end off this epic hike to the Crystal Mill and back, but this was still not the end of the adventure
Schofield_Pass_Rd_046_iPhone_10172020 - After returning to the car at Schofield Park, the adventure wasn't over yet because we still had to drive back to Crested Butte, which included scary stretches like this shelf road just south of Emerald Lake
Schofield_Pass_Rd_063_iPhone_10172020 - By the time we made it back through the small 'ghost town' of Gothic, most of the hard driving on the Gothic Road / Schofield Pass Road was over and we were well on our way towards Crested Butte

join-booking-970x240-1.jpg


The Crystal Mill Waterfall was situated within the Crystal Canyon nearby the “ghost town” of Crystal between the towns of Crested Butte and Marble.

I’ll describe the 16-mile drive from Crested Butte to the trailhead at Schofield Park since that was how I made my visit.

Schofield_Pass_Rd_016_iPhone_10172020 - Driving the pretty scary shelf on the Gothic Road/Schofield Pass Road right before Emerald Lake
Driving the pretty scary shelf on the Gothic Road/Schofield Pass Road right before Emerald Lake

The Road 317 (Gothic Road) becomes unpaved shortly after passing through the village of Mt Crested Butte, but it was quite doable by 2wd sedans (with care since there were some potholes, especially in the beginning).

After roughly roughly 25 minutes of driving (or around 6 miles from Crested Butte), we then reached the Judd Falls Lower Trailhead.

At this point, the road gets a bit rougher but still doable in a our stock SUV though I’d imagine it gets increasingly difficult for lower clearance passenger sedans.

At about 4 miles beyond the Judd Falls Trailhead, we then reached a fork in the road just past a pretty scary shelf road.

Schofield_Pass_Rd_043_iPhone_10172020 - The fork in the Schofield Pass Road where going left would lead to Emerald Lake while keeping right would continue to Schofield Pass and ultimately Schofield Park
The fork in the Schofield Pass Road where going left would lead to Emerald Lake while keeping right would continue to Schofield Pass and ultimately Schofield Park

The rough road on the left went to Emerald Lake, but the Schofield Pass Road continued on the right, where after another mile, it reached the Schofield Pass (denoted by a pair of signs with stickers all over them).

Beyond the Schofield Pass, the road descended towards the small hamlet of Schofield (technically a “ghost town”), where we kept right at the major forks.

Eventually after 2.3 miles beyond Schofield Pass, we reached a parking areas in an opening that the maps on my Gaia GPS tool called Schofield Park.

We knew to park here because we were then greeted with an ominous sign warning of a steep and narrow road ahead that should only be attempted by experienced drivers with small 4wd vehicles with a narrow wheel base.

Devils_Punch_Bowl_Crystal_Mill_034_10172020 - Context of the parking area at Schofield Park with the ominous yellow sign in the distance
Context of the parking area at Schofield Park with the ominous yellow sign in the distance

Overall, this drive between Crested Butte and Schofield Park took us around an hour.

For context, Crested Butte was about 28 miles (over a half-hour’s drive) north of Gunnison, 92 miles (under 2 hours drive) northeast of Montrose, 128 miles (about 2.5 hours drive) northeast of Ouray, 157 miles (over 3 hours drive) northeast of Telluride, 152 miles (about 3 hours drive) east of Grand Junction, 153 miles (about 3.5 hours drive) south of Marble, 199 miles (about 4.5 hours drive) south of Aspen, and 187 miles (about 4 hours drive) southwest of Denver.

sweep from downstream to upstream from the top of the scramble to the banks of the crystal river


long video showing the mill and waterfall from a few different spots during the steep descent to the banks of the river .


sweep focusing on the mill and the waterfall along with some fall foliage with colorful plunge pool .


focusing on the fringes of the plunge pool of the crystal mill before going a little further downstream for another sweep .


contextual sweep from further downstream along the crystal river from the mill and waterfall .

Related Top 10 Lists

No Posts Found

Trip Planning Resources


Nearby Accommodations



join-booking-970x240-1.jpg


Tagged with: gothic road, schofield pass road, marble, crystal, gunnison, colorado, crested butte, rocky mountains, waterfall



Visitor Comments:

No users have replied to the content on this page


Share your thoughts about what you've read on this page

You must be logged in to submit content. Refresh this page after you have logged in.

Visitor Reviews of this Waterfall:

No users have submitted a write-up/review of this waterfall


Have you been to a waterfall? Submit a write-up/review and share your experiences or impressions

Review A Waterfall

Nearest Waterfalls

The Waterfaller Newsletter

The Waterfaller Newsletter is where we curate the wealth of information on the World of Waterfalls website and deliver it to you in bite-sized chunks in your email inbox. You'll also get exclusive content like...

  • Waterfall Wednesdays
  • Insider Tips
  • User-submitted Waterfall Write-up of the Month
  • and the latest news and updates both within the website as well as around the wonderful world of waterfalls
Johnny Cheng

About Johnny Cheng

Johnny Cheng is the founder of the World of Waterfalls and author of the award-winning A Guide to New Zealand Waterfalls. Over the last 2 decades, he has visited thousands of waterfalls in over 40 countries around the world and nearly 40 states in the USA.
Read More About Johnny | A Guide to New Zealand Waterfalls.