Mary Jane Falls

Mt Charleston / Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest / Spring Mountains National Recreation Area / Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

About Mary Jane Falls


Hiking Distance: 3.4 miles round trip
Suggested Time: 2 hours

Date first visited: 2017-04-22
Date last visited: 2020-08-11

Waterfall Latitude: 36.27912
Waterfall Longitude: -115.6714

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Mary Jane Falls had to have been hands down the most popular hike in the Mt Charleston area.

Given that this waterfall featured at least three parallel segments that were each too tall to try to capture in a single photograph (maybe at least 200-300ft tall), it certainly seemed like the natural antidote to Las Vegas.

Mt_Charleston_125_04222017 - Mary Jane Falls
Mary Jane Falls

Indeed, as you can see from the photo above, pictures really don’t do this place justice, especially considering this waterfall even had waterflow deep into Summer (something I learned on my August 2020 visit).

In addition to the waterfalls, there were also little caves or alcoves to further add to the fun.

So I guess given all these things that Mary Jane Falls had going for it, its popularity was certainly understandable.

Case in point, I had to have counted dozens of large hiking groups each time I’ve done this hike, especially as I made my way back down from the falls after getting an early start.

Mt_Charleston_141_04222017 - Some guys checking out a third segment of Mary Jane Falls
Some guys checking out a third segment of Mary Jane Falls

Perhaps its proximity to being only an hour’s drive away from the Las Vegas Strip (without traffic, of course) had a lot to do with that popularity.

Who knew that such a wonderful natural attraction could be so close to the bright lights and sleaze of Sin City?

While this place wasn’t exactly my favorite in the world, I definitely had to reconsider my attitude towards coming here as I could now look forward to a waterfall in addition to some of the other Nature that can be found in Southern Nevada.

Timing Mary Jane Falls

Even as I wax poetic about how there can be this tall waterfall so close to Las Vegas, I do have to temper expectations a bit by explaining that this falls performed its best in the early Summer.

Mt_Charleston_074_04222017 - One of the segments of Mary Jane Falls struggling to flow even though there was an abundance of snow on Mt Charleston in late April 2017
One of the segments of Mary Jane Falls struggling to flow even though there was an abundance of snow on Mt Charleston in late April 2017

When I first came here in late April 2017, Mary Jane Falls had at least four segments, but they were hard to photograph because the flow was limited.

Upon coming back here in August 2020, only three of the segments flowed, but it was more of a sprinkle as the snow was long gone this deep into Summer.

So in my mind, if I wanted to time a visit here correctly, I should have come in June or as late as early July depending on the Winter snow pack.

Indeed, in order to properly time this waterfall to see it at its photogenic best, I had to pay attention to two main things.

Mt_Charleston_231_04222017 - Looking across Kyle Canyon from the foot of Mary Jane Falls towards the mountains still covered in snow in the Mt Charleston area in late April 2017
Looking across Kyle Canyon from the foot of Mary Jane Falls towards the mountains still covered in snow in the Mt Charleston area in late April 2017

First, there has to be a lot of snow accummulation in the Mt Charleston area, especially on the slopes surrounding Kyle Canyon.

Second, with the presence of snow, the weather would have to warm up quickly to maximize the flow over the waterfall.

If neither of these things happen, then the transition from a frozen column of water (assuming there was snow to begin with) into a trickling waterfall would be quick, but the falls never really seemed to go dry thanks to being fed by springs.

In fact, on my August 2020 visit, I noticed quite an extensive grove of foliage at the waterfall’s base, which seemed to thrive in its perennial flow.

Mt_Charleston_123_08112020 - Looking across a healthy grove of foliage thriving in the perennial flow of the spring-fed Mary Jane Falls
Looking across a healthy grove of foliage thriving in the perennial flow of the spring-fed Mary Jane Falls

It was just another example of how Nature managed to surprise me even despite this place being smack in the middle of the deserts of the Great Basin.

Hiking to Mary Jane Falls

In order to access Mary Jane Falls, I had to go on a hike that was at least 3 miles round-trip (my GPS logs suggested it was more like 3.2-3.4 miles round trip).

Given that this hike began at an elevation of over 7,700ft while gaining another 1,100ft, this was a deceptively strenuous hike, especially if you’re not acclimated to the thin air.

Overall, I spent about 2 hours and 45 minutes away from the car on my first time visiting in late April 2017, and I could have spent as little as 2 hours on my August 2020 visit.

Mt_Charleston_037_08112020 - I counted at least 11 switchbacks on the Mary Jane Falls Trail, where this was just one of them
I counted at least 11 switchbacks on the Mary Jane Falls Trail, where this was just one of them

This included some additional hiking to explore some caves as well as all the time I spent taking pictures.

I could have also extended this hike to include the Big Falls, which would have added another 1.6 miles round trip.

However, I wound up not doing that extra excursion because it would have involved boulder scrambling and even traversing snow.

Anyways, given the popularity of this hike, I made sure to get an early start (around 7am; when I was only one of a half-dozen cars here).

Mt_Charleston_254_04222017 - After the last of the switchbacks, the Mary Jane Falls Trail hugged this cliff all the way to the waterfalls
After the last of the switchbacks, the Mary Jane Falls Trail hugged this cliff all the way to the waterfalls

When I returned to the trailhead at around 10am on my April 2017 visit, I was very surprised at how quickly the parking lot filled up!

Mary Jane Falls Trail Description – from the trailhead to the start of the switchbacks

From the well-signposted trailhead parking lot (see directions below), I followed a pretty obvious trail gently ascending what appeared to be either an old road or a combination of road and dry wash.

After about 3/4-mile, the trail reached an unsigned fork, where there was a fallen log on the left.

I kept right at this fork to continue on the Mary Jane Falls Trail.

Mt_Charleston_032_04222017 - This fork in the trail was where the Mary Jane Falls continued on the right, while the 'trail' on the left might have been the branch-off point for Big Falls
This fork in the trail was where the Mary Jane Falls continued on the right, while the ‘trail’ on the left might have been the branch-off point for Big Falls

The wider trail veering left, which would eventually go into a dry wash was actually the start of the spur to Big Falls.

Near this wash was supposedly where a road used to lead to a campground that had been washed in a flash flood and never rebuilt.

I didn’t do this hike on my first visit in late April 2017 due to the presence of heavy snow, but I did do it when I came back in August 2020, which illustrated that it wasn’t too difficult to combine these hikes.

Anyways, later in the Mary Jane Falls hike, I would learn that it was not easy to look across the canyon towards Big Falls because it sat in a fairly concealed and shaded canyon.

Mary Jane Falls Trail Description – ascending the switchbacks to the waterfall

Mt_Charleston_040_04222017 - One of at least 11 switchbacks seen along the Mary Jane Falls Trail
One of at least 11 switchbacks seen along the Mary Jane Falls Trail

Anyways, just a couple of minutes past the fork with the Big Falls spur trail, the Mary Jane Falls Trail started to ascend several switchbacks gaining most of its 1,100ft.

Given the high altitude of the trail, this was a surprisingly strenuous stretch.

I’d imagine that if you came up from the lower elevations like Las Vegas, where your body would not have had a chance to acclimate to the thin air, the altitude sickness can be an issue here.

Further adding to the strenuous nature of climbing in high altitude, the switchbacks were also full of false trails and shortcuts.

Mt_Charleston_045_04222017 - This was an ill-defined part of the switchbacking ascent on the Mary Jane Falls Trail, where I noticed quite a few hikers confused about this part and attempted the very steep ascent on the left instead of doing what the person did up front and stay on the trail
This was an ill-defined part of the switchbacking ascent on the Mary Jane Falls Trail, where I noticed quite a few hikers confused about this part and attempted the very steep ascent on the left instead of doing what the person did up front and stay on the trail

This made things confusing and dangerous for novice hikers less aware of their surroundings.

Except for one potentially confusing part at one of the switchbacks (where the main trail traversed a rocky section while a false trail ascended immediately before it), the main trail should be pretty obvious to follow.

I happened to see a few people take the shortcuts, and it was clear that some of them bit off more than they could chew as they’d easily slide down and kick down loose rocks for every step or two they’d take.

On top of that, they caused more erosion and damage to the area impacting the ability of other people to use this trail.

Mt_Charleston_179_08112020 - Looking up at a trio of hikers who thought they could blaze their own trail and take a shortcut instead of using switchbacks on the Mary Jane Falls Trail clearly not realizing the negative impact they're having on the stability of the trail
Looking up at a trio of hikers who thought they could blaze their own trail and take a shortcut instead of using switchbacks on the Mary Jane Falls Trail clearly not realizing the negative impact they’re having on the stability of the trail

I was also aware that the forest service had to close the trail in the recent past to mitigate the effects of trail erosion thanks to these false trails.

Once I made it past the last of the switchbacks (according to my GPS logs, I counted at least 11 of them), the trail hugged the base of some tall limestone cliffs.

It also offered up views across Kyle Canyon towards the snowy mountains backing the opposite side of the canyon.

During this stretch, I was finally able to get high enough to see across the canyon the Big Falls and its hidden and shaded ravine.

Mt_Charleston_217_04222017 - Looking way in the distance across Kyle Canyon towards the streak where I believe Big Falls should be. This was shot in late April 2017 when there was still a lot of snow in the area
Looking way in the distance across Kyle Canyon towards the streak where I believe Big Falls should be. This was shot in late April 2017 when there was still a lot of snow in the area

It was merely a streak of wet walls from my distant vantage point when I was doing the Mary Jane Falls Trail in late April 2017, but it was dry when I came back in August 2020.

Anyways, on that first visit, I decided then and there that I wouldn’t bother extending the hike to get close to the Big Falls due to the snow.

Eventually, after another quarter-mile of relatively flat hiking (at least compared to the switchbacks), I finally made it to the sloped clearing at the base of the Mary Jane Falls.

Mary Jane Falls Trail Description – exploring the waterfall and beyond

I happened to show up to the Mary Jane Falls pretty early in the morning before 8:30am on my first visit, and I showed up before 8am on my second visit.

Mt_Charleston_092_04222017 - Context of one of the multi-tiered segments of Mary Jane Falls with someone standing near the bottom for scale
Context of one of the multi-tiered segments of Mary Jane Falls with someone standing near the bottom for scale

During both times, I was fortunate that the morning sun had not breached the tall cliffs neighboring the falls.

That meant that I was able to take photos of the Mary Jane Falls without harsh light and shadows compromising the ability to capture the scene.

The morning sun didn’t really start to wreak havoc on the lighting for the area until around 9:15am when I stuck around that long during my late April 2017 visit.

It’s conceivable that the lighting could be bad even earlier than this in the latter months as the sun would be higher on the horizon.

Mt_Charleston_174_04222017 - Looking back towards one of the streaks from a segment of the Mary Jane Falls as I continued to hike up to a cave
Looking back towards one of the streaks from a segment of the Mary Jane Falls as I continued to hike up to a cave

Anyways, on the underlying cliffs between two of the waterfalls, there were little caves or alcoves.

The most accessible of these alcoves was actually a short distance beyond the Mary Jane Falls on an established trail.

This alcove or “cave” offered a gorgeous view back towards the snow-capped mountains flanking Kyle Canyon.

Given these alcoves, it made me wonder whether the name of the waterfall might have had something to do with folks who might go into some of these things and smoke pot.

Mt_Charleston_175_04222017 - Looking out from a small cave beyond the Mary Jane Falls
Looking out from a small cave beyond the Mary Jane Falls

After all, with the presence of graffiti and empty beer bottles, it wouldn’t be out of the question to see traces of a bong or two here and perhaps inspire the name Mary Jane or “marijuana” in Spanish.

That said, I can also easily envision a careless forest fire running through the canyon so please refrain from having a smoke regardless of what form it is.

The return hike went far faster as it was pretty much all downhill to the trailhead.

On my first visit in late April 2017, it only took me 45 minutes to complete the return hike, where it took me nearly double that time on the way up.

Mt_Charleston_238_04222017 - Looking towards what I believe to be the Charleston Peak as I headed back down the trail from Mary Jane Falls in late April 2017
Looking towards what I believe to be the Charleston Peak as I headed back down the trail from Mary Jane Falls in late April 2017

On my second visit in August 2020, I had been acclimated from extensive hiking in the Rocky Mountains so I actually spent far less time on the Mary Jane Falls Trail than the first time (and even added the hike to Big Falls).

Authorities

Mary Jane Falls resides in the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest near Las Vegas in Clark County, Nevada. It is administered by the USDA Forest Service. For information or inquiries about the area as well as current conditions, you can try visiting their website.

Mt_Charleston_003_iPhone_08112020 - Driving up the Kyle Canyon Road as I made my early morning drive to Mt Charleston from Las Vegas during my August 2020 visit. This photo and the next several shots took place on this visit
Mt_Charleston_006_iPhone_08112020 - Following a car up the Kyle Canyon Road into the Mt Charleston area in August 2020
Mt_Charleston_002_08112020 - It was about 6:50am when I arrived at the Mary Jane Falls Trailhead Parking Lot on my August 2020 hike
Mt_Charleston_005_08112020 - Going up the familiar Mary Jane Falls Trailhead on my August 2020 hike
Mt_Charleston_006_08112020 - It was good to have an early start on the Mary Jane Falls hike because it was high elevation, uphill, and quite exposed to the sun
Mt_Charleston_010_08112020 - Continuing on the wide trail on the initial part of my August 2020 hike to Mary Jane Falls
Mt_Charleston_015_08112020 - Encountering other hikers as I was catching up to them during my August 2020 hike to Mary Jane Falls
Mt_Charleston_017_08112020 - Still gradually climbing on the initial part of my August 2020 hike to Mary Jane Falls
Mt_Charleston_019_08112020 - This was the familiar fallen log where I initially kept right to continue on the Mary Jane Falls Trail in August 2020, but I'd come back here afterwards to pursue Big Falls
Mt_Charleston_022_08112020 - Now going up the switchbacks on the Mary Jane Falls hike in August 2020
Mt_Charleston_029_08112020 - Continuing to ascend the familiar switchbacks on the Mary Jane Falls Trail in August 2020
Mt_Charleston_031_08112020 - While on the Mary Jane Falls Trail Switchbacks, I noticed some strong gusty winds creating a mini sand storm of sorts in Kyle Canyon during my August 2020 hike
Mt_Charleston_045_08112020 - Looking past this unsightly tagged boulder towards a streak in the distance showing me that Mary Jane Falls was actually still flowing even though it's August 2020
Mt_Charleston_048_08112020 - Continuing to ascend the upper switchbacks of the Mary Jane Falls Trail during my August 2020 hike
Mt_Charleston_049_08112020 - Ascending the familiar rocky switchback that seemed to confuse some hikers a little less aware of their surroundings. It seemed like not much has changed when I was here in August 2020 compared to my previous time in late April 2017
Mt_Charleston_051_08112020 - Looking across the canyon towards where I suspected Big Falls was supposed to be, but it was still not properly visible from the Mary Jane Falls switchbacks
Mt_Charleston_052_08112020 - Continuing to ascend the increasingly loose surface of the Mary Jane Falls switchbacks during my August 2020 hike to Mary Jane Falls
Mt_Charleston_057_08112020 - Finally at the top of the Mary Jane Falls Switchbacks where I then followed the trail along the base of this cliff during my August 2020 hike
Mt_Charleston_065_08112020 - Looking towards a badly-defiled alcove full of tagging, which was an unfortunate aspect of being in close proximity to Las Vegas combined with improper cost infrastructure to maintain this place
Mt_Charleston_077_08112020 - Finally approaching the Mary Jane Falls, which was still flowing even though it was August 2020
Mt_Charleston_080_08112020 - Profile view of a couple of the flowing segments of Mary Jane Falls with some lower alcoves below as seen in my August 2020 hike
Mt_Charleston_084_08112020 - On my August 2020 visit, I noticed that there were quite a few of these chipmunks that have clearly gotten accustomed to human food from being fed, which have now made them quite aggressive
Mt_Charleston_086_08112020 - Looking up at the brink of a flowing segment of Mary Jane Falls proving that indeed, it was still flowing in August 2020
Mt_Charleston_092_08112020 - Looking towards a third flowing segment of Mary Jane Falls as seen during my August 2020 visit
Mt_Charleston_121_08112020 - Looking back across the pair of flowing segments of Mary Jane Falls beneath a hanging cave as seen in August 2020
Mt_Charleston_125_08112020 - Looking away from the base of Mary Jane Falls towards the Kyle Canyon as seen in August 2020
Mt_Charleston_126_08112020 - Looking towards an overhanging segment of Mary Jane Falls that was still flowing in August 2020
Mt_Charleston_135_08112020 - Closeup look at some of the prickly vegetation still thriving in the perennial moisture of Mary Jane Falls
Mt_Charleston_147_08112020 - Broad view back across the vegetation at Mary Jane Falls towards the pair of segments streaking beneath a cave as seen in August 2020
Mt_Charleston_160_08112020 - Looking across the pair of segments on the right side of Mary Jane Falls as I peered into a pac-man-like alcove as seen during my August 2020 visit
Mt_Charleston_181_08112020 - Lots of people heading up to Mary Jane Falls as I was heading back down on my August 2020 hike
Mt_Charleston_193_08112020 - Descending the switchbacks on the way down from Mary Jane Falls in August 2020
Mt_Charleston_194_08112020 - Descending to that fallen log landmark where I then deviated and did the Big Falls hike during my August 2020 visit
Mt_Charleston_372_08112020 - After my Big Falls interlude in August 2020, I returned to the Mary Jane Falls Trail to complete the remainder of the hike
Mt_Charleston_374_08112020 - Looking back at still lots more people going up to Mary Jane Falls while I was wrapping up in August 2020
Mt_Charleston_376_08112020 - Returning to the Mary Jane Falls Trailhead parking to end my August 2020 visit to both Mary Jane Falls and Big Falls
Mt_Charleston_378_08112020 - Finally back at the Mary Jane Falls Parking Lot, which was busy, but it was full on my August 2020 visit (unlike the end of my late April 2017 visit)
Mt_Charleston_005_04222017 - Looking back at the mostly empty parking lot for Mary Jane Falls Trail when I got started at 7:15am on a cool morning in late April 2017. Note that the rest of the photos in this gallery took place on that visit
Mt_Charleston_002_04222017 - Looking towards a streak of water coming down this cliff, which was a typically dry fall visible right from the parking lot. In fact, on my April 2017 visit, I could argue that its flow was just as much as one of the segments of Mary Jane Falls
Mt_Charleston_014_04222017 - Starting the Mary Jane Falls hike as I went past this sign and restroom building in late April 2017
Mt_Charleston_027_04222017 - Initially, the Mary Jane Falls Trail gently ascended along this fairly wide path following alongside a dry wash
Mt_Charleston_028_04222017 - In late April 2017, there was still some patches of snow covering parts of the Mary Jane Falls Trail
Mt_Charleston_033_04222017 - Starting to ascend the many switchbacks (I counted 11 of them) on the most difficult part of the Mary Jane Falls Trail
Mt_Charleston_047_04222017 - While ascending the Mary Jane Falls Trail, I noticed between some trees this cave where some folks were chilling out in front of it while also yelling perhaps to see if they could hear their own echos
Mt_Charleston_052_04222017 - Once I completed the last switchback, the Mary Jane Falls Trail now hugged the base of these cliffs as the elevation gain was more gradual
Mt_Charleston_055_04222017 - Looking in the distance towards the context of the cave and the hard-to-see Mary Jane Falls far to the right of it as seen in late April 2017
Mt_Charleston_057_04222017 - Looking back across Kyle Canyon towards the hidden ravine containing the hard-to-see Big Falls as of late April 2017
Mt_Charleston_064_04222017 - The upper part of the Mary Jane Falls Trail passed by some alcoves containing some snow and unsightly graffiti as seen in late April 2017
Mt_Charleston_065_04222017 - Starting to see and hear parts of the Mary Jane Falls as I was approaching it in late April 2017
Mt_Charleston_068_04222017 - Looking across Kyle Canyon towards the snow-capped mountains on the other side of the Mary Jane Falls Trail in late April 2017
Mt_Charleston_071_04222017 - Looking up at one of the segments of the Mary Jane Falls while the morning sun was threatening to blind it out during my late April 2017 visit
Mt_Charleston_077_04222017 - Looking towards the streaky segment of Mary Jane Falls on its far right side in late April 2017
Mt_Charleston_083_04222017 - Another look at a pair of segments of Mary Jane Falls with the morning sunlight threatening to blind out its upper parts in late April 2017
Mt_Charleston_090_04222017 - Looking directly up at the leftmost segment of Mary Jane Falls with a snow patch at its base in late April 2017
Mt_Charleston_099_04222017 - Looking directly up at the left two segments of Mary Jane Falls together
Mt_Charleston_101_04222017 - Looking up towards the rightmost segment of Mary Jane Falls with some kind of hanging cave next to the middle of its drop
Mt_Charleston_106_04222017 - Looking across the base of the rightmost pair of segments of Mary Jane Falls in late April 2017
Mt_Charleston_109_04222017 - Yet another look at the leftmost pair of segments of the Mary Jane Falls
Mt_Charleston_120_04222017 - Looking directly up at the middle segment of the Mary Jane Falls
Mt_Charleston_149_04222017 - Another look across the rightmost pair of segments of the base of Mary Jane Falls
Mt_Charleston_143_04222017 - Looking downslope right into Kyle Canyon from the base of Mary Jane Falls in late April 2017
Mt_Charleston_163_04222017 - Looking back towards the middle segment of Mary Jane Falls just as the morning sun was about to hit it from the left
Mt_Charleston_168_04222017 - Looking up at the mouth of the cave that was just past the Mary Jane Falls
Mt_Charleston_172_04222017 - Looking right to the end of the cave that was past the Mary Jane Falls
Mt_Charleston_185_04222017 - Looking out from inside the cave beyond the Mary Jane Falls during my late April 2017 visit
Mt_Charleston_188_04222017 - Someone making the climb up to the opening of the cave that was beyond the Mary Jane Falls
Mt_Charleston_195_04222017 - Another look at the middle drop of Mary Jane Falls before the sun would have breached the immediate area (the leftmost one was already lit up by the morning sun)
Mt_Charleston_205_04222017 - Looking back at the leftmost pair of segments of Mary Jane Falls again, but now the morning sun was pretty much breaching the leftmost segment and was about to hit the middle segment
Mt_Charleston_259_04222017 - On my way back down the switchbacks in late April 2017, I noticed these folks taking one of the false shortcuts. As you can see, it wasn't any faster as they were initially ahead of the folks on the correct trail above them, but their scramble took longer than they expected
Mt_Charleston_260_04222017 - Looking back at some more folks going up the many switchbacks to get up to Mary Jane Falls during my late April 2017 visit
Mt_Charleston_262_04222017 - Looking out across Kyle Canyon towards the snowy rim from the Mary Jane Falls Trail
Mt_Charleston_270_04222017 - Finally making it down to the flatter part of the Mary Jane Falls Trail after descending all those switchbacks on my late April 2017 hike
Mt_Charleston_277_04222017 - Once I made it down the switchbacks, the Mary Jane Falls Trail was now gently sloping downhill as I was encountering one hiking group after another (some were bringing boom boxes and playing loud music; attesting to this place's popularity)

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To reach Mary Jane Falls from the Las Vegas Strip, I drove onto the I-15 north towards the US95 Freeway heading west.

I then followed the US95 for about 16 miles before turning left onto Kyle Canyon Rd.

Mt_Charleston_010_04222017 - This was the mostly empty trailhead parking lot for the Mary Jane Falls Trail when I first got started in the early morning
This was the mostly empty trailhead parking lot for the Mary Jane Falls Trail when I first got started in the early morning

Then, I drove on Kyle Canyon Rd (NV-157) for about 20 miles going through the village of Mt Charleston then leaving the NV-157 by turning right onto Echo Drive.

By this point, there was a brown sign for Trail Canyon and Mary Jane Falls directing me to turn this way at this point.

Continuing another 0.4 miles on Echo Drive, I then turned left onto unpaved Mary Jane Falls Rd (as directed by another brown sign), where I drove the final quarter-mile to the big parking lot at road’s end.

Overall, this 44-mile drive took me around an hour after leaving the New York New York Hotel and Casino.

Mt_Charleston_282_04222017 - Looking back at the very busy trailhead parking lot for the Mary Jane Falls hike when I came back after completing it
Looking back at the very busy trailhead parking lot for the Mary Jane Falls hike when I came back after completing it

To give you some context, Las Vegas was about 265 miles (about 4 hours drive; possibly more with traffic and drivers ignorant of the keep right except to pass highway etiquette) northeast of Los Angeles, California, 121 miles (2 hours drive) southeast of Beatty (near Furnace Creek in Death Valley), 99 miles (over 90 minutes drive) north of Laughlin, 123 miles (about 2 hours drive) southwest of St George, Utah, 276 miles (about 4.5 hours drive) west of Page, Arizona, and 424 miles (about 6 hours drive) southwest of Salt Lake City, Utah.

Examining the Mary Jane Falls from the far right side of the collection of waterfalls


Closeup examination of the sprinkling parts of the Mary Jane Falls so you can see that it is indeed flowing


Sweep starting from a zoom-in towards Big Falls across the canyon before panning over to parts of the Mary Jane Falls


Video showing the vegetation thriving in the moisture coming from Mary Jane Falls before checking out the nearest flowing part of the falls then ending with a distant look at the pair of main drops on the far right


360 degree sweep revealing three different waterfalls coming down at Mary Jane Falls with a nice view across Kyle Canyon towards snowy mountains

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Tagged with: las vegas, clark county, mt charleston, nevada, waterfall, big falls, kyle canyon



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Johnny Cheng

About Johnny Cheng

Johnny Cheng is the founder of the World of Waterfalls and author of the award-winning A Guide to New Zealand Waterfalls. Over the last 2 decades, he has visited thousands of waterfalls in over 40 countries around the world and nearly 40 states in the USA.
Read More About Johnny | A Guide to New Zealand Waterfalls.