Wangi Falls

Litchfield National Park / Batchelor, Northern Territory, Australia

About Wangi Falls


Hiking Distance: 200m round trip
Suggested Time: 10 minutes

Date first visited: 2006-06-05
Date last visited: 2006-06-05

Waterfall Latitude: -13.16376
Waterfall Longitude: 130.68524

Waterfaller Newsletter

Get over the hump of the mid-week blues! Subscribe and get exclusive curated content delivered to your inbox every Wednesday.

Wangi Falls (“Wangi” rhymes with “wrong guy”) was an attractive set of dual waterfalls sitting at the far western end of Litchfield National Park.

In the state that Julie and I saw the falls during our June 2006 visit, the pair consisted of two segments.

Wangi_Falls_056_06042006 - Wangi Falls
Wangi Falls

The narrower segment was a thin drop weaving between notches in the rugged cliff.

The thicker segment featured a two-tiered drop that was also taller than its thinner counterpart.

There was enough volume on the thicker drop producing a decent afternoon rainbow in its mist providing a bit more color to an already colorful scene.

Speaking of rainbows, Julie and I visited this waterfall at two different times of the day.

Timing A Visit to Wangi Falls

Wangi_Falls_008_06042006 - Morning light meant I could take long exposure photos of Wangi Falls
Morning light meant I could take long exposure photos of Wangi Falls

In the afternoon, we enjoyed backlighting from the warmth of the waning afternoon sun thanks to the falls being west-facing.

So the cliffs were glowing an orangish color contrasting the deep blue skies and the dark plunge pool.

We even saw the moon showing itself in the deep blue afternoon sky.

In the early morning, the falls was evenly lit in the long morning shadows.

During this time of the day, we enjoyed the serenity of being one of the first ones to visit in the day.

Wangi_Falls_005_06042006 - A bonus of our morning visit to Wangi Falls was checking out these fruit bats hanging from a tree fringing the plunge pool of the falls
A bonus of our morning visit to Wangi Falls was checking out these fruit bats hanging from a tree fringing the plunge pool of the falls

That peace and quiet also allowed us to see fruit bats hanging from neighbouring trees as well as a kangaroo grazing near the walking track.

Conditions for swimming

I understand that this was a very popular waterfall for swimming in addition to sightseeing.

However, our visit happened to be following a late-season cyclone that prolonged Wet Season conditions such that estuarine (or saltwater) as well as freshwater crocodiles were still a risk to all bodies of water around the falls.

There were signs and barricades keeping us away from the water to further reduce the risk of an ambush attack.

I’d imagine that later on in the season, the threat of the crocs would be reduced, and that would be when swimming would be possible.

Wangi_Falls_014_jx_06042006 - A crocodile sign keeping us aware that we were in their habitat
A crocodile sign keeping us aware that we were in their habitat

However, it seemed like the later into the Dry Season you wait, the drier the falls would become.

Experiencing Wangi Falls

From the car park (see directions below), we only had to walk about 100m or so to the main viewing areas for Wangi Falls (as shown in the photo at the top of this page).

However, we could’ve done a much longer 1.6km loop walk that would go up the escarpment to the very top of the falls.

Since we were content with the experience from the main viewing area, we didn’t bother doing the longer excursion.

In any case, we highly recommend a visit to this beautiful falls as our scenic rating would attest.

Authorities

Wangi Falls resides in Litchfield National Park near Batchelor in the Northern Territory. It is administered by the Northern Territory Government. For information or inquiries about the area as well as current conditions, visit their website.

Wangi_Falls_002_06042006 - We inadvertently startled this kangaroo on our way to Wangi Falls
Wangi_Falls_010_jx_06042006 - Look closely at the dark spots hanging from the tree.  They're bats!
Wangi_Falls_018_06042006 - Our first look at Wangi Falls from the official viewing deck
Wangi_Falls_021_06042006 - Focused on just the thinner drop of Wangi Falls
Wangi_Falls_016_06042006 - Focused on just the thicker drop of Wangi Falls
Wangi_Falls_029_06042006 - We came back to Wangi Falls in the late afternoon where we saw a moon hovering above it

join-booking-970x240-1.jpg


Getting to Wangi Falls requires driving some 66km west of Batchelor and Rum Jungle on the Litchfield Park Road (Hwy 30). It’s a short distance north of where the road bends away from the spur 4wd road to Tjaynera (Sandy Creek) Falls and the Blythe Homestead. And like most waterfalls in Litchfield, this waterfall is well signposted and quite easy to see.

For context, Batchelor was 97km (over an hour drive) south of Darwin.

Related Top 10 Lists

No Posts Found

Trip Planning Resources


Nearby Accommodations



join-booking-970x240-1.jpg


Tagged with: litchfield, batchelor, rum jungle, darwin, northern territory, australia, waterfall, outback, bats, crocodiles



Visitor Comments:

No users have replied to the content on this page


Share your thoughts about what you've read on this page

You must be logged in to submit content. Refresh this page after you have logged in.

Visitor Reviews of this Waterfall:

No users have submitted a write-up/review of this waterfall


Have you been to a waterfall? Submit a write-up/review and share your experiences or impressions

Review A Waterfall

Nearest Waterfalls

The Waterfaller Newsletter

The Waterfaller Newsletter is where we curate the wealth of information on the World of Waterfalls website and deliver it to you in bite-sized chunks in your email inbox. You'll also get exclusive content like...

  • Waterfall Wednesdays
  • Insider Tips
  • User-submitted Waterfall Write-up of the Month
  • and the latest news and updates both within the website as well as around the wonderful world of waterfalls
Johnny Cheng

About Johnny Cheng

Johnny Cheng is the founder of the World of Waterfalls and author of the award-winning A Guide to New Zealand Waterfalls. Over the last 2 decades, he has visited thousands of waterfalls in over 40 countries around the world and nearly 40 states in the USA.
Read More About Johnny | A Guide to New Zealand Waterfalls.