Fall Creek Falls

Angeles National Forest / Tujunga / Sunland, California, USA

About Fall Creek Falls


Hiking Distance: about 5 miles round trip (includes stream scramble and bushwhack)
Suggested Time: about 4 hours

Date first visited: 2022-01-08
Date last visited: 2022-01-08

Waterfall Latitude: 34.30641
Waterfall Longitude: -118.16375

Waterfall Safety and Common Sense

Fall Creek Falls was one of those waterfalls that started to get some notoriety in recent years, but in the past, it was more of a a fun rappel for canyoneers due to its multi-drop characteristic.

That said, we didn’t need to do any technical rappeling or abseiling to really experience this seasonal waterfall, but it did require a bit of an adventure.

Fall_Creek_Falls_175_01082022 - Fall Creek Falls
Fall Creek Falls

We noticed from our visit that Fall Creek plunged at least three (maybe four) times, which was easily viewable from across the Big Tujunga Canyon (more on this in the trail description below).

According to the USFS 2016 topo layer map on Gaia GPS, it appeared that the overall height over these lower tiers was on the order of about 230ft (though I’m sure there are probably more tiers further upstream).

In any case, this wasn’t the first waterfall that had the apparent redundant name of Fall Creek Falls, but upon chatting with a person who explores this area quite a bit, he did offer up the very sensible explanation.

You see, upon witnessing how there was a plethora of autumn colors persisting all over Big Tujunga Canyon during our January 2022 visit, it made sense that the “fall” in the name Fall Creek pertained to the fall colors!

Fall_Creek_Falls_302_01082022 - Fall Creek Falls fronted by attractive leaves exhibiting the namesake fall colors even though this picture was taken in January!
Fall Creek Falls fronted by attractive leaves exhibiting the namesake fall colors even though this picture was taken in January!

Therefore, it’s not “Falls Creek” as I had initially thought, but it could very well be the singular form which pertains to the apparent persistence of the autumn season here.

Timing Fall Creek Falls

Like many waterfalls in the Big Tujunga Canyon area, which happens to be in a somewhat drier part of the San Gabriel Mountains, Fall Creek Falls does not have perennial flow.

In fact, on our visit to this waterfall in early January 2022 was barely a week after the last of some heavy rain storms have passed in late December.

However, the local who I chatted with said that the waterfall was already in low flow, and that it probably only has 3-4 weeks left before it can barely be seen.

Fall_Creek_Falls_114_01082022 - Examining the upper three drops (there may be a fourth one behind the foliage between the lower two drops), which is already in low flow according to someone I met during our hike who frequents this area
Examining the upper three drops (there may be a fourth one behind the foliage between the lower two drops), which is already in low flow according to someone I met during our hike who frequents this area

I’m thinking that it’s this short season combined with the rougher, hazard-filled scrambling and hiking to reach its base that that makes Fall Creek Falls less popular than its more popular counterparts like Trail Canyon Falls.

Further exacerbating its obscurity, perhaps mislabeled crowd-sourced point-of-interest pins on Google Maps (like one that incorrectly this waterfall Josephine Creek Falls) misled people as well.

Fall Creek Falls Hiking Summary

The hike to Fall Creek Falls consists of two main parts…

  • Fall Creek Road
  • The Canyon Floor Scramble

According to my GPS logs the overall hike is on the order of 5 miles round-trip with about 600ft of elevation loss (so it’s an upside down hike).

Fall_Creek_Falls_068_01082022 - The initial two miles of the Fall Creek Falls adventure was pretty tame as it followed along the Fall Creek Road
The initial two miles of the Fall Creek Falls adventure was pretty tame as it followed along the Fall Creek Road

That said, it could be shorter by a few tenths of a mile because there was a bit of pathfinding on this hike.

We wound up spending about 4.5 hours away from the car, but had we been better prepared, it could be less than 4 hours in total.

For the Fall Creek Road part, it’s a pretty straightforward hike on a fire road for 2 miles (4 miles round-trip) as it descends into Big Tujunga Canyon.

Towards the latter part of this stretch, we’re able to witness most of the drops of Fall Creek Falls across the canyon.

Fall_Creek_Falls_320_01082022 - Tahia in the process of removing her shoes so she can cross the Big Tujunga Creek barefooted
Tahia in the process of removing her shoes so she can cross the Big Tujunga Creek barefooted

However, in order to reach the bottom of the waterfall (so we could interact with it), we have to go on a bit of a rough scramble within the canyon.

This involves crossing the Big Tujunga Creek multiple times while also being exposed to poison oak as well as getting poked by desert vegetation like yucca.

Most of the higher difficult rating along with the increase in time commitment that you see in the sidebar of this page comes from the canyon floor scramble.

If that’s a bit too much, you can still witness Fall Creek Falls from a distance and only go as far as the Big Tujunga Creek at the end of the Fall Creek Road.

Trail Description – Fall Creek Road

Fall_Creek_Falls_030_01082022 - Hiking on Fall Creek Road, which was overgrown in spots and was exposed to some dropoffs. Although this road was pretty comfortably wide for hikers, it must have been pretty scary to drive
Hiking on Fall Creek Road, which was overgrown in spots and was exposed to some dropoffs. Although this road was pretty comfortably wide for hikers, it must have been pretty scary to drive

We started the hike from a gate blocking the Fall Creek Road (see directions below).

From there, we followed the rather wide and tame fire road, which had been affected by the Station Fire in 2009.

In addition to remnants of burnt vegetation, we also saw evidence of rockfalls and minor landslides that resulted from the soil destabilization due to the lack of live vegetation in the aftermath of the fires.

It was pretty smooth going on this stretch, and after about 1.1 miles from the gate, we encountered a seasonal side waterfall draining the north face of Josephine Peak.

Fall_Creek_Falls_406_01082022 - This was about as much of the side waterfall next to Fall Creek Road (draining the north face of Josephine Peak) that I was able to see after a short but rough overgrown scramble
This was about as much of the side waterfall next to Fall Creek Road (draining the north face of Josephine Peak) that I was able to see after a short but rough overgrown scramble

This particular waterfall had two small tiers dropping audibly behind thick overgrowth when it’s flowing (so it was hard to properly see and photograph).

There was a barrier with a water tunnel below the road, which forced a rough and overgrown scramble around the left side to reach the plunge pool (though it was by no means a sanctioned access).

This temporary side waterfall also had upper tiers though they were also difficult to see given the gully’s steep profile combined with the thick vegetation.

Beyond the waterfall in the next 0.4-mile, the trail skirted away from the gully to the north before rounding a bend and then starting to reveal Fall Creek Falls across the canyon.

Fall_Creek_Falls_183_01082022 - Looking back across Big Tujunga Canyon towards the context of the lowermost drop of Fall Creek Falls. Note that this far down the Fall Creek Road, its upper tiers could no longer be seen
Looking back across Big Tujunga Canyon towards the context of the lowermost drop of Fall Creek Falls. Note that this far down the Fall Creek Road, its upper tiers could no longer be seen

This was where we got the most satisfying views of the multi-tiered waterfall’s upper and middle tiers.

And within the next 0.2-mile, we were able to see more of the waterfall’s lowermost drops (as the upper waterfall tiers were concealed due to Fall Creek’s twisting trajectory).

Finally at 2 miles from the trailhead, the trail dropped into Big Tujunga Canyon, where the fire road disappeared over a combination of fallen trees, overgrowth, some mild rock slides, and the Big Tujunga Creek itself.

Further progress from here would require an unofficial off-trail scramble.

Trail Description – The Canyon Floor Scramble

Fall_Creek_Falls_184_01082022 - The Fall Creek Road descending into the floor of Big Tujunga Canyon. Notice the autumn colors to the lower left of this photo
The Fall Creek Road descending into the floor of Big Tujunga Canyon. Notice the autumn colors to the lower left of this photo

Within the floor of Big Tujunga Canyon, we first had to follow the Big Tujunga Creek downstream for about 0.1-mile.

In this stretch, we managed to stay dry as we followed some faint use-trails over boulders and some limited overgrowth all under some impressive trees yielding leaves with the namesake fall colors during our visit.

Then, we got to a point where further progress involved going into the Big Tujunga Creek, and it’s here that I’d recommend changing into water shoes (unless you’re wearing one of those aquatic hiking shoes from the start).

While it may be tempting to just cross the creek here and then try to find a dry route all the way to the bottom of Fall Creek Falls, we found it easiest to stay in the creek for about 200ft.

Fall_Creek_Falls_213_01082022 - This was the open shore hugging the cliff wall on the left where it was probably easiest to stay along instead of attempting to bushwhack (in the presence of poison oak mind you) on the north side of the creek just to attempt to stay dry
This was the open shore hugging the cliff wall on the left where it was probably easiest to stay along instead of attempting to bushwhack (in the presence of poison oak mind you) on the north side of the creek just to attempt to stay dry

To the left side, there was an open “shore” where we could then follow it to a stagnant “narrow” with the cliff wall on one side and lots of overgrowth on the other.

We had to be real careful in this “narrow” because poison oak was growing against the cliff wall as well as within the thick overgrowth on the opposite side.

Beyond the narrow, we then left the creek and scrambled on a dry section that involved going over a fallen tree as well as trying to dodge prickly yucca and other desert vegetation.

The overgrown path eventually reached the Big Tujunga Creek again, where we then found a fairly shallow crossing towards our right.

Fall_Creek_Falls_227_01082022 - Tahia hiking within Big Tujunga Canyon on the way to the bottom of Fall Creek Falls. It involved quite a bit of stream scrambling as well as dodging prickly desert vegetation in dry patches like this
Tahia hiking within Big Tujunga Canyon on the way to the bottom of Fall Creek Falls. It involved quite a bit of stream scrambling as well as dodging prickly desert vegetation in dry patches like this

Once we were beyond this crossing, we then went the final 0.2-mile or so through more prickly yucca patches before making the last poison-oak-flanked approach up to the base of Fall Creek Falls.

The area at the plunge pool around Fall Creek Falls didn’t have a whole lot of real estate to enjoy the falls as we were pretty much right up against its base (so it was hard to photograph in its entirety).

Thus, we didn’t spend too much time in the cool spray beneath the waterfall, but we did spend more time a little further back from the falls where we took pictures of that lower drop of the falls framed by foliage with fall colors.

By the way, only the last drop of Fall Creek Falls could be seen at its base as its upper drops were too far set back to be seen.

Fall_Creek_Falls_241_01082022 - Making the final approach past this prickly yucca path to the base of Fall Creek Falls
Making the final approach past this prickly yucca path to the base of Fall Creek Falls

Finally, because our group had people who didn’t bring a change of shoes, we ultimately spent about 50 minutes on this scramble on the way in, but only 25 minutes on the way out.

Most of the time spent was largely due to waiting for people to take off shoes, go in the stream barefeet, and then put back on the shoes in the rough drier parts.

Authorities

Fall Creek Falls resides in the Angeles National Forest near Pasadena in Los Angeles County, California. It is administered by the USDA Forest Service. For information or inquiries about the area as well as current conditions, visit their website or Facebook page.

Fall_Creek_Falls_007_01082022 - The Fall Creek Falls hike began from the Big Tujunga Canyon Road at the start of the Fall Creek Road. This is what it looks like looking back at the Big Tujunga Canyon Road from the gate
Fall_Creek_Falls_015_01082022 - Fall Creek Road was pretty wide and easy to hike, but I'd imagine it would have been a bit scarier to drive back in the days before the Station Fire wiped out the Fall Creek Camp down inside the canyon
Fall_Creek_Falls_017_01082022 - Looking in the direction of where Josephine Creek is supposed to be from the start of the Fall Creek Road
Fall_Creek_Falls_021_01082022 - It had been years since vehicles were allowed to drive onto Fall Creek Road, I'd imagine, because of the amount of overgrowth encroaching on the road itself
Fall_Creek_Falls_022_01082022 - Looking further down towards the lower reaches of Fall Creek Road. Yes, the lines you see in this picture are indeed part of the hike, which gives you an idea of how far it is to get down into Big Tujunga Canyon
Fall_Creek_Falls_028_01082022 - Julie going past some more overgrowth along the narrowing Fall Creek Road en route to Fall Creek Falls
Fall_Creek_Falls_031_01082022 - Julie rounding a bend in Fall Creek Road as it was about to skirt one of the dry gullies on the way down into Big Tujunga Canyon
Fall_Creek_Falls_037_01082022 - In the winter time, the Fall Creek Road goes in and out of the shade so it's actually not too hot of a hike.  However, it's probably going to be brutal when the sun is higher on the horizon later in the season
Fall_Creek_Falls_045_01082022 - Going past some burnt vegetation alongside the Fall Creek Road
Fall_Creek_Falls_049_01082022 - Continuing along the somewhat wide and shaded Fall Creek Road while still skirting past some overgrowth
Fall_Creek_Falls_061_01082022 - Looking back into Big Tujunga Canyon in the direction of Fox Canyon and Josephine Creek from the Fall Creek Road as we continued to descend lower
Fall_Creek_Falls_063_01082022 - Some of the vegetation encroaching on the Fall Creek Road were prickly vegetation, especially the yucca plants which had very sharp and sturdy leaves
Fall_Creek_Falls_066_01082022 - This part of Fall Creek Road flanked a cliff
Fall_Creek_Falls_074_01082022 - There was some degree of rockfalls or fallen rocks alongside the Fall Creek Road, which I'd imagine would have been insurmountable obstacles had this road still be open to vehicles
Fall_Creek_Falls_079_01082022 - A little over 1.1 miles from the trailhead, we encountered this hidden seasonal waterfall right behind some thick overgrowth
Fall_Creek_Falls_087_01082022 - This was one of the more overgrown parts of Fall Creek Road during our January 2022 visit
Fall_Creek_Falls_090_01082022 - Some of that overgrowth by the Fall Creek Road consisted of the spiny yucca, which really became 'literally' a thorn in our sides later on in this hike
Fall_Creek_Falls_094_01082022 - Noticing some infrastructure holding up or reinforcing the Fall Creek Road
Fall_Creek_Falls_097_01082022 - The floor of Big Tujunga Canyon getting closer as the trail still went generally to the northeast
Fall_Creek_Falls_102_01082022 - First look at the upper drops of Fall Creek Falls from the Fall Creek Road during our January 2022 visit
Fall_Creek_Falls_107_01082022 - Broad contextual view of the upper drops of Fall Creek Falls as seen from Fall Creek Road
Fall_Creek_Falls_113_01082022 - Contextual look at Fall Creek Falls as we went lower down the Fall Creek Road
Fall_Creek_Falls_122_01082022 - This may have been the only angle from which we could see all three (maybe four) tiers of Fall Creek Falls without a drone
Fall_Creek_Falls_130_01082022 - Fall Creek Falls with the context of the floor of Big Tujunga Canyon
Fall_Creek_Falls_141_01082022 - Now, the lowermost drop of Fall Creek Falls could be seen in its entirety but the uppermost drops could not
Fall_Creek_Falls_153_01082022 - Context of this angle of Fall Creek Falls with the canyon floor to the lower right of it as seen from Fall Creek Road
Fall_Creek_Falls_157_01082022 - During the morning of our visit to Fall Creek Falls, we happened to catch this faint rainbow in its drop
Fall_Creek_Falls_168_01082022 - Following the local that I chatted with who knew Big Tujunga Canyon pretty well
Fall_Creek_Falls_177_01082022 - Full context of the lowermost drop of Fall Creek Falls and the floor of Big Tujunga Canyon
Fall_Creek_Falls_189_01082022 - Finally making it into the floor of Big Tujunga Canyon which marked the conclusion of the Fall Creek Road portion of the hike
Fall_Creek_Falls_193_01082022 - Now doing a bit of a scramble alongside Big Tujunga Creek which involved going by boulders while also trying to dodge the prickly vegetation
Fall_Creek_Falls_194_01082022 - The initial part of the canyon floor scramble was fairly benign and dry, but we still had to mind those pesky yucca plants
Fall_Creek_Falls_197_01082022 - We also had the benefit of following Jay, which wanted to help to make sure the women in the group made it to the bottom of Fall Creek Falls during our January 2022 visit
Fall_Creek_Falls_201_01082022 - Jay pointed out that these stalks were wild bamboo that he says were native to this part of Big Tujunga Canyon. Who knew that bamboo could naturally grow in Southern California?
Fall_Creek_Falls_202_01082022 - More scrambling over fallen trees on the way to Fall Creek Falls within Big Tujunga Canyon
Fall_Creek_Falls_204_01082022 - This was at the point where we had no choice but to get into Big Tujunga Creek in order to proceed to Fall Creek Falls
Fall_Creek_Falls_211_01082022 - It wasn't wise to cross the Big Tujunga Creek because it quickly degenerated into a very rough bushwhack
Fall_Creek_Falls_212_01082022 - This shore to the left was where we should have gone instead of bushwhacking on the right in pursuit of trying to stay dry en route to Fall Creek Falls
Fall_Creek_Falls_217_01082022 - Going back across Big Tujunga Creek when we realized the error in our route
Fall_Creek_Falls_219_01082022 - Now that we were back on the easier side of Big Tujunga Creek, we then followed this use trail over a fallen tree
Fall_Creek_Falls_230_01082022 - It was definitely a bit of an overgrown scramble even on this more 'benign' path en route to the base of Fall Creek Falls
Fall_Creek_Falls_324_01082022 - Noticing some claw marks on this tree trunk near the final crossing of Big Tujunga Creek
Fall_Creek_Falls_234_01082022 - Tahia going across the final crossing of Big Tujunga Creek en route to the Fall Creek Falls' base
Fall_Creek_Falls_237_01082022 - After the last crossing of Big Tujunga Creek, we then went past these boulders before having to traverse another yucca patch before Fall Creek Falls
Fall_Creek_Falls_245_01082022 - Finally approaching the base of Fall Creek Falls though we still had to dodge yucca and poison oak
Fall_Creek_Falls_249_01082022 - Within the confined plunge pool at the bottom of Fall Creek Falls
Fall_Creek_Falls_254_01082022 - Looking up towards the top of Fall Creek Falls from its base
Fall_Creek_Falls_004_mom_01082022 - Mom took this well-composed shot of Fall Creek Falls fronted by colorful leaves
Fall_Creek_Falls_267_01082022 - Fall Creek Falls' lowermost drop in long-exposure
Fall_Creek_Falls_272_01082022 - Looking across the plunge pool at the bottom of Fall Creek Falls, where you can see from the overgrowth here that there really wasn't much viewing real-estate here
Fall_Creek_Falls_281_01082022 - Looking up at an angle of Fall Creek Fall's top of the lowermost drop
Fall_Creek_Falls_283_01082022 - Another angled look at Fall Creek Falls in long-exposure
Fall_Creek_Falls_294_01082022 - Looking back at Fall Creek Falls when a trio of young guys showed up and started to let the waterfall given them a shower
Fall_Creek_Falls_307_01082022 - After having our fill of Fall Creek Falls, we now had to go back through this prickly yucca-filled dry patch on the floor of Big Tujunga Canyon
Fall_Creek_Falls_314_01082022 - One guy actually brought his child down to the bottom of Fall Creek Falls carrying an Osprey Poco Plus. I couldn't imagine how he managed to do this without letting his child get pricked by the yucca or rubbed by the poison oak
Fall_Creek_Falls_328_01082022 - On the way back from Fall Creek Falls, this time we followed the cliff wall and stayed in the water in this 'narrow' so we wouldn't have to change shoes as much
Fall_Creek_Falls_330_01082022 - Continuing the stream scramble in Big Tujunga Creek instead of crossing the creek and changing shoes a bunch of times
Fall_Creek_Falls_335_01082022 - Paying attention to the autumn colors that were all around us inside Big Tujunga Canyon. Maybe that's why the waterfall we visited was called Fall Creek Falls
Fall_Creek_Falls_341_01082022 - Making our way back out of Big Tujunga Canyon to regain the Fall Creek Road
Fall_Creek_Falls_342_01082022 - Savoring the fall colors as we started to head back up the Fall Creek Road
Fall_Creek_Falls_357_01082022 - Julie making the long climb back up to the Big Tujunga Canyon Road
Fall_Creek_Falls_358_01082022 - Getting one last look at Fall Creek Falls on the way back up
Fall_Creek_Falls_379_01082022 - Tahia and Mom making their way up the Fall Creek Road with power pylons in the background
Fall_Creek_Falls_382_01082022 - The pointy end of the leaves of yucca plants like this were literally poking us
Fall_Creek_Falls_386_01082022 - Julie and Tahia continuing the long ascent back up to Big Tujunga Canyon Road
Fall_Creek_Falls_404_01082022 - One more look at the overgrown seasonal side waterfall by the Fall Creek Road
Fall_Creek_Falls_409_01082022 - Looking down at the outflow coming from that seasonal side waterfall by the Fall Creek Road
Fall_Creek_Falls_416_01082022 - Julie still continuing past some burnt vegetation on the long ascent back up to Big Tujunga Canyon Road
Fall_Creek_Falls_430_01082022 - We noticed graffiti near the Fall Creek Road trailhead
Fall_Creek_Falls_435_01082022 - We also noticed shameful displays of littering by the start of the Fall Creek Road, which we didn't really notice on the way down
Fall_Creek_Falls_437_01082022 - Finally making it back to the Fall Creek Road gate and the Big Tujunga Canyon Road
Fall_Creek_Falls_441_01082022 - Looking at more of the litter around the Fall Creek Road gate and the ravine below
Fall_Creek_Falls_445_01082022 - Context of the broken glass that we noticed at the start of our Fall Creek Falls hike
Fall_Creek_Falls_444_01082022 - Closer look at the broken glass in the pullout area fronting the Fall Creek Road gate


Like with other waterfalls in Big Tujunga Canyon, there are actually a couple of ways to drive to the trailhead for Fall Creek Falls – one via Sunland and the other via La Canada-Flintridge.

Either way, we’re going to start the driving description from the 210 Freeway at Pasadena (which is north of downtown Los Angeles).

Fall_Creek_Falls_015_iPhone_01082022 - Crossing a bridge over Big Tujunga Canyon with Josephine Peak in the background. That mountain is responsible for the side waterfall we saw on the way down to Fall Creek Falls
Crossing a bridge over Big Tujunga Canyon with Josephine Peak in the background. That mountain is responsible for the side waterfall we saw on the way down to Fall Creek Falls

So from the 210 Freeway at Pasadena, we headed west towards Sunland and the Sunland Blvd exit.

Then, we turned right onto Sunland Blvd and followed this busy street for 3/4-mile to Oro Vista Ave. or 1.5 miles to Mt Gleason Rd.

You can turn left at either of those streets, and both streets will eventually deposit you to the Big Tujunga Canyon Road.

From where Oro Vista Ave became Big Tujunga Canyon Rd, we followed Big Tujunga Rd for a little under 11 miles to a small pullout area on the left backed by a locked gate (north side of Big Tujunga Canyon Rd).

Fall_Creek_Falls_005_01082022 - Context of the pullout area fronting the gate for the Fall Creek Road
Context of the pullout area fronting the gate for the Fall Creek Road

This pullout with the barricade or gate has limited parking (maybe about a half-dozen cars or so provided no one blocks the gate), and it would be a little around 4.3 miles from the Clear Creek Station going in the opposite direction on Big Tujunga Canyon Road.

Note that the 7-11 shop at Oro Vista Ave also sold Angeles Forest passes, which you’d need to display in your vehicle anywhere you park within the boundaries of the Angeles National Forest.

In addition, if the Clear Creek Ranger Station (by the Angeles Crest Highway) is open, then you can also pay cash to get Forest Service Adventure Passes from there as well.

Fall_Creek_Falls_004_01082022 - The gate blocking vehicular access to Fall Creek Road (not that most people would want to drive it anyways)
The gate blocking vehicular access to Fall Creek Road (not that most people would want to drive it anyways)

Finally, to give you some idea of the geographical context, Pasadena was about 13 miles (20 minutes drive without traffic) from Sunland, 11 miles (anywhere from 20-60 minutes depending on traffic) from downtown Los Angeles, 34 miles (about 45 minutes without traffic) from Santa Clarita, and 56 miles (over an hour drive without traffic) from Irvine.

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Right to left sweep from lower in the Big Tujunga Canyon before focusing on the three lower drops of Fall Creek Falls


Right to left sweep along the Big Tujunga Canyon before zooming in on the lowermost drop of Fall Creek Falls


Checking out the area at the base of Fall Creek Falls though Julie made some chatter


Up and down and back up sweep of the Fall Creek Falls from its base without as much chatter


Brief up-down and back up sweep of Fall Creek Falls from an angle


Long video thoroughly exploring the side waterfall on the way back up from Fall Creek Falls

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Tagged with: sunland, tujunga, angeles national forest, los angeles, angeles crest, southern california, california, waterfall, tom lucas camp



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Johnny Cheng is the founder of the World of Waterfalls and author of the award-winning A Guide to New Zealand Waterfalls. Over the last 2 decades, he has visited thousands of waterfalls in over 40 countries around the world and nearly 40 states in the USA.
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