Phantom Falls

North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve / Oroville, California, USA

About Phantom Falls


Hiking Distance: 5 miles round trip
Suggested Time: 2.5-3 hours

Date first visited: 2021-04-09
Date last visited: 2021-04-09

Waterfall Latitude: 39.61074
Waterfall Longitude: -121.56062

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Phantom Falls was an impressive plunging 164ft waterfall flanked by giant basalt columns as well as a thinner companion waterfall.

While the waterfall itself was something we found worth targeting for a visit ever since we first learned about it, I thought it was the wildflower blooms that made this excursion even if the waterflow wasn’t great.

Phantom_Falls_108_04092021 - Phantom Falls
Phantom Falls

The falls ran on the seasonal Gold Run stream, which was probably so-named from this area’s Gold Rush heyday in the middle of the 19th century.

That was a time when settlers first came to California in waves in an attempt to strike it rich (and causing problems with Native Americans), which ultimately forever changed the state to what it is today.

These days, the North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve (through which the Phantom Falls Trail passed) consisted of wide open pastures grazed by cattle from neighboring farms.

And it’s this open field of grasslands that resulted in conditions ripe for Spring wildflowers, which we were fortunate to witness during our early April 2021 visit.

Phantom_Falls_045_04092021 - Wildflowers almost superblooming in the open pastures along the Phantom Falls Trail (and 2021 was a drought year) were what really made the Phantom Falls hike, in my mind
Wildflowers almost superblooming in the open pastures along the Phantom Falls Trail (and 2021 was a drought year) were what really made the Phantom Falls hike, in my mind

In any case, it was the waterfalls that drew us to this area, and it turns out that there are quite a handful of them here, which can be combined in longer, extended hikes.

However, for the purposes of this write-up, I’ll just focus on the Phantom Falls experience, and point out the departure points for the other waterfalls that I’ve managed to visit (which have their own separate write-ups).

Timing A Visit To Phantom Falls

Before getting into the trail description, I wanted to discuss the timing of making a visit since this waterfall has a limited season.

In my mind, there are three considerations for timing a visit, and they are to:

  1. Visit during the maximum waterflow
  2. Visit during the peak superbloom of the wildflowers
  3. Visit when the lighting is best
Phantom_Falls_098_04092021 - Focused look at Phantom Falls still hanging onto its flow in Spring 2021. Note the people on the bluff to the topright providing a sense of scale
Focused look at Phantom Falls still hanging onto its flow in Spring 2021. Note the people on the bluff to the topright providing a sense of scale

If I had to make a guess, I’d argue that Phantom Falls would flow best in the Winter and early Spring periods, but this is completely dependent on how much precipitation has fallen in California’s Wet Season (typically Winter and early Spring).

When we visited in early April 2021, most of California was having a drought year so the Gold Run stream was well past the peak and was in danger of trickling or going dry in another month of no rain.

As you can see in the first photo on this page, the smaller companion waterfall was definitely trickling during that visit.

So based on that observation, perhaps early- to mid-March was ideal for a visit to see the falls flow well, but again, this window can shift depending on the Winter rainfall accumulations.

Phantom_Falls_208_04092021 - Looking back at the context of the Phantom Falls Trail flanked on each side by large mats of wildflowers
Looking back at the context of the Phantom Falls Trail flanked on each side by large mats of wildflowers

As for the timing of the wildflowers bloom, it seemed like our early April 2021 visit was either at or just past the peak.

Indeed, as you can see in the photos on this page, the fields were decorated in multiple hues.

I suspect that the wildflower blooms has to do with the temperatures so they may bloom early if the temperatures rise in the Spring earlier rather than later.

As a result, perhaps March might be the start of the blooms, if I had to take a guess, and if you combine that with the waterflow, I’m guessing March would have been great for the year 2021.

Phantom_Falls_234_04092021 - Closeup look at some of the countless wildflowers blooming around the Phantom Falls Trail
Closeup look at some of the countless wildflowers blooming around the Phantom Falls Trail

Nevertheless, maybe in a different year where Northern California might have seen more rain as well as warm temperatures in the Spring, then perhaps April would have been better.

It all depends on both precipitation and temperature patterns.

Finally, in terms of time of day to visit Phantom Falls and its neighboring waterfalls, I’d argue that early- to mid-afternoon on a sunny day would be best because just about all waterfalls faced west.

Under such conditions, you might even see a rainbow if the sun’s in the right position as it starts to sink into the horizon.

Phantom_Falls_184_04092021 - Phantom Falls scattering in the wind and producing afternoon rainbows in its mist
Phantom Falls scattering in the wind and producing afternoon rainbows in its mist

Of course, if the weather’s overcast, then time of day doesn’t matter so much, and at that time, perhaps avoiding crowds (typically an early start will help with that) becomes the priority.

Trail Improvements and Permits

As far as the trail description is concerned, it seems to be vastly improved compared to the chaotic and less-developed conditions described in prior trip reports on the internet.

So I’ll just focus on what I’ve seen, which I’d imagine was more straightforward than what crowdsourced websites like AllTrails or TripAdvisor might lead you to believe.

In fact, from my observations, a large percentage of people who provide feedback on those crowdsourced platforms tend not to follow hiking ethics nor exercise situational awareness.

Phantom_Falls_053_04092021 - Clearly labeled signs were present at each major trail junction, which I found to be a pleasant (and helpful) surprise considering some of the prior trip reports that I had read
Clearly labeled signs were present at each major trail junction, which I found to be a pleasant (and helpful) surprise considering some of the prior trip reports that I had read

Such behavior tends to adversely impact the experience for other people who follow after them.

The bottom line is that if you stay on the trails and follow the signs (as well as respecting social distancing), then you’re far less likely to commit trespassing or trampling where you shouldn’t.

Finally, there is a per-person fee to procure a CDFW Lands Pass to visit the North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve, which I was able to do by buying my permit online.

Apparently, you can also do it on the spot as there’s a QR code on one of the trailhead signs.

Phantom_Falls_003_04092021 - Sign at the trailhead with a QR code to pay the CDFW land pass fees on the spot.  Now if only they collected enough to enforce limiting visitor numbers and payment of the permits to control the overcrowding and non-ethical behavior
Sign at the trailhead with a QR code to pay the CDFW land pass fees on the spot. Now if only they collected enough to enforce limiting visitor numbers and payment of the permits to control the overcrowding and non-ethical behavior

Sometimes I wonder how well this fee collection is enforced though as I’d imagine there were more non-paying visitors than those who have paid.

Trail Description – From The Trailhead To Ravine Falls

Starting from the trailhead parking area for the North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve (see directions below), I traversed a cattle maze and embarked on a fairly wide and well-used trail.

During my visit, it was flanked by mats of colorful wildflowers as the trail followed signage saying that I was leaving the ecological reserve boundary.

At about a half-mile, I reached a signed trail junction where the path on the left went to Hollow Falls (I have a separate write-up for this optional excursion), and the path on the right continued to Phantom Falls.

Phantom_Falls_027_04092021 - Sign at the junction between the Hollow Falls Trail and the Phantom Falls Trail at roughly a half-mile from the trailhead
Sign at the junction between the Hollow Falls Trail and the Phantom Falls Trail at roughly a half-mile from the trailhead

Following the continuation of the Phantom Falls Trail, it continued to traverse a wide open field with a couple of temporary streams to cross.

The first of these crossings was on Campbell Creek, which was the stream responsible for Hollow Falls.

So if there’s a good amount of water in this creek, then it might be worthwhile to extend a visit to see the other waterfall.

Other than that, this wide open path meandered for another 0.6-mile to another signpost pointing the way towards Ravine Falls.

Phantom_Falls_056_04092021 - Looking towards the trickling upper drop of Ravine Falls right before descending into the namesake ravine
Looking towards the trickling upper drop of Ravine Falls right before descending into the namesake ravine

From this signpost, I then went another 0.2-mile when I noticed the namesake ravine as well as what turned out to be the upper drop of Ravine Falls, which was trickling during my visit.

I’d imagine that this sign was here to keep hikers on the path going left into the ravine instead of skirting around it (and trespassing along the way).

So continuing on the proper trail, it narrowed as it descended roughly 100ft into the ravine descending towards a switchback before making the final descent towards a signed junction for the spur at the base of Ravine Falls.

From in these depths, Ravine Falls provided a gentle spray in its cool, shady grotto, and it provided temporary relief from the warm afternoon sun exposure throughout most of this hike.

Phantom_Falls_063_04092021 - Looking up towards the top of Ravine Falls from its cool and shaded base roughly 1.7 miles from the trailhead
Looking up towards the top of Ravine Falls from its cool and shaded base roughly 1.7 miles from the trailhead

The base of Ravine Falls was about 1.7 miles from the trailhead (according to my GPS logs) though I recalled some signage suggesting it was more like 1.5 miles.

Trail Description – Beyond Ravine Falls

Continuing on the trail to Phantom Falls, after crossing Ravine Creek, the trail then climbed another 140ft to leave the ravine.

Towards the top of this climb, there was some fencing (probably erected to keep people away from the neighboring private property) as well as lots more wildflowers (including California poppies).

Nearby, there was another trail coming in from the right, and I’d imagine that must have been the old trail that involved trespassing.

Phantom_Falls_081_04092021 - Lots of California poppies in bloom as I left the ravine and continued hiking towards Phantom Falls
Lots of California poppies in bloom as I left the ravine and continued hiking towards Phantom Falls

Anyways, continuing on this trail for another half-mile, I reached another signposted junction, where the path going left went 0.1-mile to the Phantom Falls Overlook as well as another 0.7-mile to Lower Ravine Falls (the latter has a separate write-up).

On the other hand, the vast majority of visitors continued straight ahead for the last 0.1-mile to a fairly wide bluff providing a more isolated and direct look at Phantom Falls.

This was the turnaround point for the majority of visitors, and my GPS logs suggested that it was roughly 0.8-mile from Ravine Falls to this overlook or 2.5 miles from the trailhead.

By the way, if you’re looking for that photo showing both Phantom Falls and the “Little Phantom Falls” together in one shot, that came from a precarious overlook that branched off from the Lower Ravine Falls Trail.

Phantom_Falls_126_04092021 - Approaching the precarious lookout on top of a basalt knob yielding a nice view of both Phantom Falls and the 'Little Phantom Falls' together
Approaching the precarious lookout on top of a basalt knob yielding a nice view of both Phantom Falls and the ‘Little Phantom Falls’ together

I say it’s precarious because it involved a bit of careful maneuvering on a narrow basalt ledge before climbing on the other side of its crease and onto a basalt knob.

When I checked out this unsigned spot, I was all alone as apparently not many people were aware of it.

However, I found this to be one of the most peaceful ways to view Phantom Falls, especially since there seemed to be California condors gliding this way and that in Coal Canyon.

Trail Description – Beyond Phantom Falls

Finally, while most people turned back from the overlooks of Phantom Falls, I took that as an opportunity to extend my visit and try to enjoy the scenery from other, more unusual perspectives.

Phantom_Falls_217_04092021 - Context of the profile of Phantom Falls as I went beyond the 'common' lookout bluff and towards the waterfall's brink
Context of the profile of Phantom Falls as I went beyond the ‘common’ lookout bluff and towards the waterfall’s brink

First, I continued to skirt along the rim of Coal Canyon as I followed a trail that descended steeply towards the Gold Run Stream and the brink of Phantom Falls.

Since there were no railings, I had to exercise extreme caution in not edging out too close to the edge of the cliff.

Beyond the Gold Run, the trail then steeply ascended as it narrowed and traversed another field of wildflowers.

Clearly, there were fewer people that went this far, which explained why the trail was narrower, but it ultimately turned west and got me to the top of one of the giant basalt bluffs looking back at the Phantom Falls.

Phantom_Falls_248_04092021 - Looking back over the precarious brink of Phantom Falls. Notice the bluff in the topright of this photo, which was the 'common' overlook that most people turned around at
Looking back over the precarious brink of Phantom Falls. Notice the bluff in the topright of this photo, which was the ‘common’ overlook that most people turned around at

This informal viewpoint was about a quarter-mile beyond the brink of Phantom Falls, or a half-mile beyond the overlook that most visitors went to.

During my visit, I did notice one couple who seemed to be locals that knew what they were doing that managed to scramble their way down underneath the overhang behind Phantom Falls.

From what I could tell, there was a faint overgrowth use-trail that steeply went into one of the ravines between basalt bluffs before skirting along the base of the basalt cliffs.

There is definitely some risk involved in doing this, and I opted not to follow them down to the base of the falls.

Phantom_Falls_238_04092021 - Context of Phantom Falls as seen from the other side of the Gold Run Stream. Notice the couple that figured out a way to reach the basalt overhang at the waterfall's base
Context of Phantom Falls as seen from the other side of the Gold Run Stream. Notice the couple that figured out a way to reach the basalt overhang at the waterfall’s base

Nevertheless, the fact that I witnessed these people pull off that feat tells you that it is possible, but it’s definitely not for everyone.

If I had to tally up all the hiking that I did just to experience Phantom Falls, then I’d say that the hiking distance was a minimum of 4.5 miles round-trip.

But with some extra exploration, I probably went more like over 5 miles round-trip (keeping in mind that I did do other detours for Lower Ravine Falls and Hollow Falls as well as going past the brink of Phantom Falls).

Overall, I spent a solid 4.5 hours away from the car (including all the detours), but I’d imagine that you can easily spend about 3 hours on just the Phantom Falls excursion alone.

Authorities

Phantom Falls resides in a combination of the North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve and some private lands near Oroville in Butte County, California. It is administered by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. For information or inquiries about the area as well as current conditions, visit their website.

Phantom_Falls_002_04092021 - Passing through the cattle maze to start on the hike for Phantom Falls as well as to check out the wildflowers along the way
Phantom_Falls_007_04092021 - Just to give you an idea of how busy it was at the parking lot for the North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve, look at how many cars were parked (and this doesn't even show 3 more rows of cars as well as others parked along Cherokee Road)
Phantom_Falls_010_04092021 - Following the early part of the Phantom Falls Trail, which strangely enough doesn't go far before it leaves the Ecological Reserve
Phantom_Falls_011_04092021 - Signs indicating that the Phantom Falls Trail was leaving the ecological reserve early on
Phantom_Falls_014_04092021 - Following the grassy Phantom Falls Trail which was flanked by many wildflowers. Just imagine how much crazier it would be had there been a wetter year!
Phantom_Falls_021_04092021 - Close-up look at some of the wildflowers (I think they're California poppies) along the Phantom Falls Trail
Phantom_Falls_022_04092021 - Looking along some stream (I think it's the Campbell Creek) as I continued along the Phantom Falls Trail
Phantom_Falls_026_04092021 - Looking over some purple wildflowers towards a lone tree in the distance in a scene that reminds me a lot of Toscana
Phantom_Falls_032_04092021 - Looking over more mats of wildflowers towards other trees, but it seems like some people went off-trail in order to get that Instagram shot, I guess
Phantom_Falls_036_04092021 - Continuing along the Phantom Falls Trail as it was surrounded by wildflowers. Granted early April 2021 didn't have the greatest display, but it was still impressive nonetheless
Phantom_Falls_038_04092021 - More of the open Phantom Falls Trail where the wildflowers help to make me forget that I was baking in the sun under the unseasonably warm temperatures (which I'm guessing was in the 80s)
Phantom_Falls_039_04092021 - Another closeup of many wildflowers seen along the Phantom Falls Trail
Phantom_Falls_041_04092021 - Looking back at the context of the Phantom Falls Trail and the many mats of wildflowers around it
Phantom_Falls_046_04092021 - Continuing along the Phantom Falls Trail flanked by purple and white wildflowers
Phantom_Falls_047_04092021 - Sign keeping people on the trail as I was approaching the ravine and Ravine Falls
Phantom_Falls_049_04092021 - Another look across more mats of colorful wildflowers along the Phantom Falls Trail
Phantom_Falls_050_04092021 - Looking over more wildflowers across the start of the ravine containing the Ravine Falls
Phantom_Falls_052_04092021 - Continuing on the Phantom Falls Trail while still flanked by purple and white wildflowers. After seeing photo ops after photo ops of wildflowers, that ought to give you an idea of how extensive the wildflower mats were here
Phantom_Falls_055_04092021 - Looking towards the trickling upper tier of Ravine Falls before descending into the ravine
Phantom_Falls_057_04092021 - Following the narrowing trail for Phantom Falls as it descended into the ravine towards Ravine Falls
Phantom_Falls_059_04092021 - Approaching a switchback as some people were coming back from Ravine Falls
Phantom_Falls_061_04092021 - Descending into the ravine towards Ravine Falls
Phantom_Falls_065_04092021 - Looking up towards the top of Ravine Falls
Phantom_Falls_067_04092021 - Checking out the full height of Ravine Falls from its base
Phantom_Falls_068_04092021 - Looking across the plunge pool at the base of Ravine Falls
Phantom_Falls_071_04092021 - Continuing beyond Ravine Creek and heading up towards Phantom Falls
Phantom_Falls_073_04092021 - Going up and out of the ravine as I left Ravine Falls and continued towards Phantom Falls
Phantom_Falls_079_04092021 - Towards the top of the ravine, there was a large bloom of California poppies during my early April 2021 visit
Phantom_Falls_086_04092021 - In the early afternoon, I got this view over Lake Oroville towards some mountains in the haze in the distance as seen from the Phantom Falls Trail
Phantom_Falls_088_04092021 - Approaching some rare tree cover as the Phantom Falls Trail went to the next signed trail junction as it was approaching Coal Canyon
Phantom_Falls_090_04092021 - Looking over another mat of yellow and purple wildflowers towards the head of Coal Canyon, which is where the Phantom Falls dropped into
Phantom_Falls_092_04092021 - In order to see both Phantom Falls and 'Little Phantom Falls' together, I actually had to keep going away from the main Phantom Falls Trail
Phantom_Falls_093_04092021 - Looking right at the trickling 'Little Phantom Falls', which was struggling to flow in early April 2021 so I'd imagine that I must have missed it performing by a month
Phantom_Falls_095_04092021 - When I approached the precarious basalt knob for a nice vista of both Phantom Falls and 'Little Phantom Falls', I had to traverse this notch while being careful not to fall off the narrow basalt ledges
Phantom_Falls_109_04092021 - Finally getting a look at both Phantom Falls and 'Little Phantom Falls'
Phantom_Falls_113_04092021 - Direct look at Phantom Falls from the precarious basalt knob with some people standing on the main overlook outcrop for some scale
Phantom_Falls_118_04092021 - It might be hard to tell in this photo, but one of the condors or eagles flew right in front of my line-of-sight towards Phantom Falls
Phantom_Falls_122_04092021 - Looking down at another condor or eagle from the precarious basalt outcrop overlook of Phantom Falls
Phantom_Falls_123_04092021 - Looking down Coal Canyon towards the agricultural pastures beyond
Phantom_Falls_128_04092021 - Looking back at the context of the precarious basalt knob that I had stood on to look at Phantom Falls and 'Little Phantom Falls'
Phantom_Falls_130_04092021 - Looking down at the context of the 'Little Phantom Falls' with people hiking the Phantom Falls Trail going over its drainage
Phantom_Falls_169_04092021 - About to cross the temporary stream responsible for the 'Little Phantom Falls'
Phantom_Falls_179_04092021 - context of Phantom Falls  through the cattle maze to start on the hike for Phantom Falls as well as to check out the wildflowers along the way
Phantom_Falls_199_04092021 - Looking towards the Phantom Falls with a pair of large basalt bluffs that looks like it had been sheared off to reveal the pronounced basalt columns there
Phantom_Falls_201_04092021 - Context of people making it to the main overlook of Phantom Falls, which was essentially the turnaround point for most visitors that I saw
Phantom_Falls_210_04092021 - As I started to hike closer to Phantom Falls, I managed to get this view over a notch
Phantom_Falls_211_04092021 - Looking back at the main overlook where other hikers were still checking out Phantom Falls
Phantom_Falls_212_04092021 - Looking back at people hiking back from the Phantom Falls Overlook flanked by wildflowers
Phantom_Falls_214_04092021 - Context of the use-trails leading towards the brink of Phantom Falls
Phantom_Falls_216_04092021 - Looking across the profile of Phantom Falls with a trio of sheared basalt cliffs in the background
Phantom_Falls_224_04092021 - This was the Gold Run Stream heading towards the brink of Phantom Falls
Phantom_Falls_227_04092021 - Looking back towards the Gold Run Stream as I was climbing past Phantom Falls towards more alternate views of it
Phantom_Falls_229_04092021 - I wasn't alone as I pursued other ways to experience Phantom Falls beyond its stream
Phantom_Falls_231_04092021 - More wildflowers blooming alongside the use-trails leading towards the alternate views of Phantom Falls
Phantom_Falls_235_04092021 - Looking down at a pair of locals who knew how to get to the base of Phantom Falls
Phantom_Falls_240_04092021 - Contextual look at Phantom Falls from the other side of Coal Canyon's head
Phantom_Falls_243_04092021 - The trail was less defined on this side of Coal Canyon as not many people go this far
Phantom_Falls_245_04092021 - Looking down over the brink of Phantom Falls
Phantom_Falls_254_04092021 - Looking along the profile of the basalt cliff faces on the far side of Coal Canyon
Phantom_Falls_259_04092021 - Context of a pair of girls taking pictures of themselves with Phantom Falls
Phantom_Falls_265_04092021 - Looking towards wildflowers on an alternate trail closer to the private property boundaries on the way back
Phantom_Falls_266_04092021 - This was one of the private property boundaries with signage clearly telling visitors to keep out
Phantom_Falls_279_04092021 - Ascending back out of the ravine after descending into it on the return hike.  I believe the old trail (that involved trespassing) bypassed this ravine
Phantom_Falls_290_04092021 - A pair of cow keeping an eye on me as I tried to go past them on the Phantom Falls Trail during the return hike
Phantom_Falls_354_04092021 - When I got back to the North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve's parking lot, I started to see cows taking advantage of the cooler temperatures to resume their grazing
Phantom_Falls_355_04092021 - Finally making it back to the cattle maze comprising the start and end of the Phantom Falls adventure


Phantom Falls was best accessed from the North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve Trailhead, which is near Oroville so I’ll describe the driving directions from there.

I’ll also describe the driving directions as if we were coming from Chico.

Driving from Oroville to North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve Trailhead

Phantom_Falls_357_04092021 - Trailhead parking at the North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve
Trailhead parking at the North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve

From the main drag through Oroville on Montgomery Street (there’s a Hwy 70 off-ramp for it), we’d take it east towards a roundabout with Table Mountain Blvd (4th exit).

Then, we’d drive north on Table Mountain Blvd for about 0.8-mile before turning right onto Cherokee Road.

Finally, we’d follow the paved but somewhat narrow, unbanked, and bumpy Cherokee Road for a little over 6 miles to the North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve Parking Lot on the left.

When we were there in early April 2021, it was so busy that people even parked there cars on either side of Cherokee Road going at least a half-mile or more in each direction.

Cherokee_Rd_002_iPhone_04092021 - After having our fill of Phantom Falls and the North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve, we took the Cherokee Road towards Oroville before heading south on the Hwy 70
After having our fill of Phantom Falls and the North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve, we took the Cherokee Road towards Oroville before heading south on the Hwy 70

That gives you an idea of how busy it can get here.

Overall, this 8-mile drive should take less than 30 minutes.

Driving from Chico to North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve Trailhead

From Chico, we’d drive the Hwy 99 south for about 15 miles to its junction with the northbound Hwy 70.

Then, we’d follow the Hwy 70 north for a little over 6 miles to a turnoff for Cherokee Road on the right.

Phantom_Falls_001_04092021 - Looking towards the front side of the North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve Parking Lot
Looking towards the front side of the North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve Parking Lot

Next, we’d follow Cherokee Road for about 5.5 miles to the North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve Trailhead Parking on the right.

Overall, this 28-mile drive would take roughly 30 minutes.

For more geographical context, Oroville was about 70 miles (roughly 1 hour and 15 minutes drive) north of Sacramento, 94 miles (90 minutes drive) south of Redding, 152 miles (2.5 hours drive) north of San Francisco, 151 miles (3 hours drive) west of South Lake Tahoe, 184 miles (3 hours drive) north of San Jose, and 451 miles (7 hours drive) north of Los Angeles.

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Deliberate 360 degree sweep from one of the main lookouts for Phantom Falls in light flow


360 degree sweep from the precarious rock outcrop before zooming in on the trickling companion waterfall and the Phantom Falls


360 degree sweep showing in between a crevice of Phantom Falls as well as the surrounding bluffs and wildflowers


Back and forth semi-circular sweep from one of the basalt bluffs on the opposite side of Phantom Falls with some a couple that managed to figure out a way to the bottom


Semi-circular sweep from the brink of Phantom Falls


Semi-circular sweep showing the upper tier of Ravine Falls


Video examining both sides of Ravine Falls' base

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Tagged with: north table mountain ecological reserve, oroville, chico, gold run, ravine falls, wildflowers, cows



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Johnny Cheng is the founder of the World of Waterfalls and author of the award-winning A Guide to New Zealand Waterfalls. Over the last 2 decades, he has visited thousands of waterfalls in over 40 countries around the world and nearly 40 states in the USA.
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