AEgissidufoss

Hella, South Region (Suðurland), Iceland

About AEgissidufoss


Hiking Distance: roadside
Suggested Time:

Date first visited: 2007-07-06
Date last visited: 2021-08-20

Waterfall Latitude: 63.81953
Waterfall Longitude: -20.41667

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AEgissidufoss (Ægissiðufoss; I think it’s pronounced “AYE-jih-sih-thuh-foss”) was a wide waterfall on the river Ytri Rangá, which I found interesting because I was able to photograph the falls with Mt Hekla in the background.

Mt Hekla was said to be one of the most active volcanos in Iceland as it has erupted at least once in almost every century since the Settlement Age.

AEgissufoss_036_07062007 - Ægissiðufoss backed by Mt Hekla
Ægissiðufoss backed by Mt Hekla

From the car park (see directions below), it was a short walk to get a view of the waterfall.

When we first visited in July 2007, we managed to get right to the bank of the Ytri-Rangá River for the view you see in the photo above.

On that visit, we were lucky enough to have good enough weather to even see Mt Hekla behind Ægissiðufoss because it’s usually covered in clouds (something that happened to us when we came back 14 years later).

Speaking of our August 2021 visit, we noticed that there was a wooden-stepped path descending to the banks of the river (which wasn’t there when on our first visit).

AEgissidufoss_005_08202021 - Looking across the private wooden-stepped path leading down to the banks of the Ytri-Rangá River in front of Ægissiðufoss as seen on our August 2021 visit
Looking across the private wooden-stepped path leading down to the banks of the Ytri-Rangá River in front of Ægissiðufoss as seen on our August 2021 visit

However, that path was labeled private so the riverside views were now considered trespassing and we had to be content with more elevated views higher up away from the riverbank.

I suspect that the riverbank path was meant for those with permits to fish this part of the river, and the salmon ladder to the left side of Ægissiðufoss further drove home the point that fish do frequent the Ytri-Rangá.

As a result, we didn’t spend very much time at this waterfall though I couldn’t help but notice that there was a bench on the other side of the river.

This suggested that it might have been possible to visit the other side of Ægissiðufoss though I’m not sure what it would take to get there since we didn’t do it.

AEgissufoss_030_07062007 - Contextual view of Ægissiðufoss backed by Mt Hekla as seen during our first time here in July 2007
Contextual view of Ægissiðufoss backed by Mt Hekla as seen during our first time here in July 2007

Finally, I tried to look up the meaning of the first part of the waterfall’s name, ægissiðu, which meant “eggshell”, but it didn’t seem to make much sense in the context of this waterfall.

Given the many forms that nouns and adjectives can take in the Icelandic language (via a grammatical construct known as “declensions”), it’s hard to say if there’s a different meaning or translation that I’m missing here.

For example, ægissið could mean “the egg” while ægissiður could mean “custom”, and neither of these things make much sense to me in the context of this waterfall.

Authorities

Ægissiðufoss resides in the South Region near Hella, Iceland. It is administered by the municipality of Rangárþing eystra. For information or inquiries about the general area as well as current conditions, you may want to try visiting their website.

AEgissidufoss_041_08202021 - Looking back at the potholed access road leading to the car park for Ægissiðufoss during our August 2021 visit
AEgissidufoss_001_08202021 - Mom approaching a gate to get closer to view Ægissiðufoss during our August 2021 visit
AEgissidufoss_004_08202021 - Mom following along the elevated banks of the river to get closer to Ægissiðufoss during our August 2021 visit
AEgissidufoss_011_08202021 - Looking towards Ægissiðufoss with its salmon ladder to the left of it as seen during our August 2021 visit
AEgissidufoss_012_08202021 - Long-exposed look at Ægissiðufoss during our August 2021 visit
AEgissidufoss_019_08202021 - Another look across the Ægissiðufoss Waterfall fronted by a wooden set of private steps leading down to the banks of the Ytri-Rangá
AEgissidufoss_031_08202021 - Context of Mom checking out Ægissiðufoss with the wooden steps below her during our August 2021 visit
AEgissidufoss_036_08202021 - More sideways view of Ægissiðufoss and its fish ladder during our August 2021 visit
AEgissidufoss_037_08202021 - Looking across Ægissiðufoss towards a rest bench on the other side of the Ytri-Rangá, which made me wonder if it was possible to experience the falls from the other side
AEgissidufoss_038_08202021 - Looking downstream from Ægissiðufoss so you can get an idea of the Ytri-Rangá River and where the wooden steps would take you
AEgissufoss_011_07062007 - This was our first look at Ægissiðufoss with Mt Hekla imposing in the background as of July 2007
AEgissufoss_028_07062007 - Another contextual look at Ægissiðufoss in long exposure as seen in July 2007
AEgissufoss_032_07062007 - Closer look at Ægissiðufoss with Mt Hekla imposing in the background during our July 2007 visit


AEgissidufoss (Ægissiðufoss) was literally a short distance downstream from the town of Hella.

From the roundabout east of the Ytri-Rangá River in Hella, we’d drive about 850m (crossing the bridge over the river) to the Route 25 whose turnoff was on the left.

AEgissidufoss_002_08202021 - The small car park and picnic area for the Ægissiðufoss Waterfall on our August 2021 visit
The small car park and picnic area for the Ægissiðufoss Waterfall on our August 2021 visit

Then, we’d drive about 2.7km south on the Route 25 until reaching a signed turnoff on the left for Ægissiðufoss, where we’d then drive the final 400m on a rather bumpy and potholed stretch to the car park.

Overall, this drive would take about 5 minutes.

For geographical context, Hella was 37km (30 minutes drive) east of Selfoss, 13km (about 15 minutes drive) west of Hvolsvöllur, and 94km (about 90 minutes drive) southeast of Reykjavík.

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Back and forth sweep from between the private steps and the fish ladder by the falls, which includes a zoomed-in panning of the falls itself


Back and forth sweep as seen from further downstream closer to the picnic area and car park, but Mt Hekla was shrouded in clouds and not visible


Zig-zagged sweep revealing the falls zoomed in before zooming out for context


Trying to stay fixated on the falls and Mt Hekla during our July 2007 visit. But as you can see from how shaky the video was, Julie was really fighting the strong winds

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Tagged with: hella, hekla, selfoss, hlidarendi, saga trail, ring road, hvolsvollur, south region, southern iceland, sudurland, iceland, waterfall



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