Strupenfossen and "Nonfossen"

Myklebustdalen, Sogn og Fjordane County, Norway

About Strupenfossen and “Nonfossen”


Hiking Distance: roadside
Suggested Time:

Date first visited: 2005-06-30
Date last visited: 2019-07-20

Waterfall Latitude: 61.70809
Waterfall Longitude: 6.63749

Find Nearby Accommodation



Booking.com

join-booking-970x240-1.jpg

Strupenfossen (or just Strupen) was a waterfall that seemed to have a bit of a reputation for being one of the tallest waterfalls in Norway.

Julie and I had doubts about this stature considering we saw a trio of its drops from within the valley that looked nowhere near as high as the over 800m drop that was reported in the literature.

Myklebust_019_07192019
Strupenfossen as seen during our visit in 2019

That said, it could very well be that had we seen it from further away or from a higher vantage point, there might have been more hidden tiers further upstream.

In fact, when I did the measurement on Norgeskart, if I measured over the run from near the Myklebustbreen to the floor of Myklebustdal Valley, the height different appeared to exceed 900m!

But if I just focus on the steepest part of its drop (maybe a run of about 400-500m), I only get a height figure of around 260m in height.

Nevertheless, the crashing tiers of the falls were the result of the melting ice from Myklebustbreen.

Myklebust_013_06302005
Strupenfossen when we first saw it on our first Norway trip in 2005

Since it was no longer part of the larger Jostedalsbreen Glacier system (it didn’t join up with the Melkevollbreen by Briksdal), I can only wonder when the high flow would start to diminish as a result of the diminishing glacier.

The falls faced west so I’d imagine it would be best seen on a cloudy day or in the afternoon.

On our first visit here in 2005, it was a clear day and we found ourselves looking against the sun during our late morning visit.

Anyways, this was a roadside waterfall for all intents and purposes so no physical exertion was necessary to experience it.

“Nonfossen”

Myklebust_010_06302005
This was the waterfall Nonfossen as we saw it in 2005, which Julie and I thought was prettier than Strupenfossen even though it was more obscure

Speaking of lighting, across the valley, we did see a very tall and attractive waterfall on the watercourse Nonselva opposite the Strupenfossen.

Based on this watercourse’s name, we decided to call this impressive falls “Nonfossen.”

And since this was an east-facing waterfall, the morning sun that wreaked havoc on our Strupenfossen view was perfect for “Nonfossen”.

On our first visit here in 2005, we even noticed a farm worker tending to his field in his tractor as he and his giant field fronted the falls provided a sense of scale of how tall the falls was.

Myklebust_022_07192019
Lots of cows fronting Nonfossen and looking in my direction as if they were expecting something from me

When I came back here in 2019, I noticed a lot of changes to this part of the Myklebustdal Valley as the fields were dominated by cattle pastures with big farm buildings.

As I had seen a Tine truck drive through here, I suspected that there was quite a bit of big business farming in support of supplying dairy products to the ubiquitous Tine brand that we had seen in grocery stores all over Norway.

Anyways, despite the fact that this falls seemed to lack an official name, the maps seemed to suggest that a highland lake sourced it so it may have a more permanent flow than its obscurity would lead us to believe.

Nevertheless, waterfall peculiarities aside, there was no denying that our detour into Myklebustdalen was memorable and gorgeous.

Myklebust_003_06302005
This beautiful shot of the mountains of Myklebustdal Valley being reflected was of the lake Sanddalsvatnet. It was scenery like this that made our impromptu journey into this quiet valley so memorable on our first visit in 2005

This was especially thanks to the reflective lake Sanddalsvatnet as well as the steep-walled U-shaped valley that was evidence of a glacier that once filled this valley.

Authorities

Strupenfossen resides in the Gloppen Municipality. For information or inquiries about the area as well as current conditions, visit their website or Facebook page.

Myklebust_003_07192019
Myklebust_010_07192019
Myklebust_013_07192019
Myklebust_015_07192019
Myklebust_027_07192019
Myklebust_001_jx_06302005
Myklebust_005_jx_06302005
Myklebust_008_06302005
Myklebust_009_jx_06302005
Myklebust_007_jx_06302005
Myklebust_012_06302005
Myklebust_011_jx_06302005

join-booking-970x240-1.jpg


Strupenfossen and “Nonfossen” sat within the quiet Myklebustdalen Valley. The key town accessing this was Byrkjelo.

From Byrkjelo sentrum, we then left the E39 to go north on the Fv60 for about 900m before turning right to go onto the Fv693 into Myklebust.

Fv60_003_07192019
Descending towards Byrkjelo which was the town where we then accessed the quiet Myklebustdalen Valley

We then drove about 9km to some unmarked pullout spaces where we managed to get pretty clean views of both Strupenfossen as well as “Nonfossen”.

For some geographical context, Byrkjelo was 20km (under 30 minutes drive) north of Skei, 40km (about 45 minutes drive) southwest of Olden, 57km (about an hour drive) southwest of Stryn, 63km (about an hour drive) northeast of Førde, 81km (over an hour drive) north of Sogndal, 132km (about 2.5 hours drive) southwest of Geiranger, and 238km (under 4 hours drive with a ferry crossing) northeast of Bergen.

Related Top 10 Lists

No Posts Found

Tagged with: gloppen, sandane, myklebust, myklebustdalen, byrkjelo, skei, sogn og fjordane, norway, waterfall, sanddalsvatnet

Visitor Comments:

No users have replied to the content on this page


Share your thoughts about what you've read on this page

You must be logged in to submit content. Refresh this page after you have logged in.

Visitor Reviews of this Waterfall:

No users have submitted a write-up/review of this waterfall


Have you been to a waterfall? Submit a write-up/review and share your experiences or impressions

Review A Waterfall

Nearest Waterfalls