Goat Falls

Sawtooth Wilderness / Stanley, Idaho, USA

About Goat Falls


Hiking Distance: about 10 miles round-trip (incl. scrambling at end)
Suggested Time: 6-8 hours

Date first visited: 2021-06-17
Date last visited: 2021-06-17

Waterfall Latitude: 44.17632
Waterfall Longitude: -115.01803

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Goat Falls has been widely reported to be the tallest waterfall in the state of Idaho at 650ft.

While that’s the kind of claim that makes people perk up with interest, what these sources don’t tell you is that it’s really a mountain cascade that doesn’t reveal all of itself.

Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_238_06172021 - As much of Goat Falls as I was able to see
As much of Goat Falls as I was able to see

In fact, you only get to see part of it on a very rugged hike to Goat Lake, which is the waterfall’s source.

Indeed, I tend to view the falls as more of an incidental attraction to the scenic Goat Lake, which sits in the heart of the Sawtooth Mountains of Central Idaho near Stanley.

I found the Sawtooth Mountains to be striking and reminiscent of the Grand Tetons, which kind of illustrates the scenic value that Stanley has to offer.

Furthermore, the Goat Lake hike brought us close-up views of some of those jagged peaks of the Sawtooths while showing us tall companion cascades, a distant view of Stanley with its surrounding valley, and a surprise wildlife sighting.

Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_294_06172021 - Goat Lake
Goat Lake

That said, as much as I enjoyed the scenery leading up to Goat Falls and Goat Lake, partaking in this adventure took my Mom and I nearly the whole day to fully experience.

It’s both long and rugged so the hiking difficulty that I gave this excursion reflects that it’s no joke.

To be honest, I don’t think it’s worth going through the trouble just for Goat Falls.

If you’re pursuing this waterfall, then you mind as well go all the way to Goat Lake to really reap the benefits that this adventure offers.

Logistics of Hiking to Goat Falls

Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_036_06172021 - A tricky crossing of Iron Creek on a wobbly log, where having our trekking poles definitely helped with the balance
A tricky crossing of Iron Creek on a wobbly log, where having our trekking poles definitely helped with the balance

Just to give you an idea of what it takes to do this hike, we took about 10 hours to cover the 10 total miles of distance.

We encountered one tricky crossing of Iron Creek, which forced us to balance on a wobbly log over pretty deep water (making us glad we brought our trekking poles).

However, there was a considerable amount of route-finding and scrambling over slopes with loose rocks, which certainly increased the chances of getting injured on this hike.

In fact, I suspect this might be why I noticed an absence of any mention of Goat Falls nor Goat Lake on any of the handful of signs that we encountered (perhaps for liability or lack of trail maintainability reasons).

Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_190_06172021 - Mom on the brutal scrambling stretch of the Goat Lake 'Trail' where loose dirt, steep terrain, lack of trail maintenance, and exposure to dropoffs or loose boulders made this a pretty risky adventure
Mom on the brutal scrambling stretch of the Goat Lake ‘Trail’ where loose dirt, steep terrain, lack of trail maintenance, and exposure to dropoffs or loose boulders made this a pretty risky adventure

Even though we’ve seen other hikers (mostly younger) able to do this hike in as little as perhaps 6 hours, we also took an hour to enjoy Goat Lake as well as more time taking pictures in addition to all the route-finding and consulting our Gaia GPS app.

The bottom line is that this excursion is no joke, and it’s not something you look up on AllTrails and decide to go on a lark without a good deal of experience and preparation.

Anyways, the hike to Goat Falls and Goat Lake involved three main sections, which I’ll describe in detail below.

Trail Description of Goat Falls and Goat Lake: The Stanley Lake Trail

From the Iron Creek Trailhead (see directions below), we signed the self-help wilderness permit and attached it to our pack (only one per party is necessary).

Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_009_06172021 - Filling out a self-help wilderness permit and attaching it to our pack before setting out to hike to Goat Lake
Filling out a self-help wilderness permit and attaching it to our pack before setting out to hike to Goat Lake

I believe they do this for search and rescue reasons as well as to keep tabs on who is currently in the Sawtooth Wilderness should there be an emergency situation.

From there, the Stanley Lake Trail was pretty straightforward to follow as we were on a maintained path that made a gradual gain in elevation of about 300ft.

After a little over a half-mile, the trail started to go alongside Iron Creek before veering slightly away from it.

Then, at about 1.3 miles from the trailhead, we encountered a signed trail junction between the Stanley Lake Trail and the Alpine Way Trail.

Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_022_06172021 - The Stanley Lake Trail skirting by a section of Iron Creek
The Stanley Lake Trail skirting by a section of Iron Creek

From there, we took the fork on the left to go onto the Alpine Way Trail.

Trail Description of Goat Falls and Goat Lake: The Alpine Way Trail

Barely a couple minutes into the Alpine Way Trail of the Goat Lake hike, we encountered a rather tricky crossing of Iron Creek.

Because we showed up in mid-June 2021, we actually had to contend with quite a bit of water on Iron Creek.

So the logs that we had to balance on to get across the creek weren’t as plentiful as some of the videos and trip reports we had seen.

Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_090_06172021 - After traversing Iron Creek, the Alpine Way Trail was still pretty straightforward to follow, but it was mostly uphill and had quite a bit of dropoff exposure along the way
After traversing Iron Creek, the Alpine Way Trail was still pretty straightforward to follow, but it was mostly uphill and had quite a bit of dropoff exposure along the way

Fortunately, we had our trekking poles to help with our balance on the wobbly logs without falling into the creek.

Once we got past the crossing, we then had to go on a fairly long two-mile stretch where the trail gained quite a bit of elevation (roughly 500ft or so) on a combination of switchbacks and uphill ledge trails with some degree of dropoff exposure.

Even though this was a fairly long stretch of maintained hiking trail, we did enjoy scenic views of the Sawtooth Mountains up close while also getting a surprise wildlife encounter with a fox and a kill in its mouth.

It took us a little over 90 minutes to traverse this stretch before we encountered another signed trail junction.

Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_112_06172021 - A surprise sighting of some kind of fox with a kill in its mouth that we encountered while hiking on the Alpine Way Trail towards Goat Lake
A surprise sighting of some kind of fox with a kill in its mouth that we encountered while hiking on the Alpine Way Trail towards Goat Lake

Strangely, the sign said “Alpine Way”, which pointed to the fork on the left, but there was no sign for the obvious fork on the right.

This was where having the paid version of Gaia GPS with the local trail map downloaded for offline use proved to be quite useful when we’d encounter headscratching moments like this.

Trail Description of Goat Falls and Goat Lake: The Goat Lake “Trail” to Goat Falls

For the purposes of this write-up, I will refer to the hike deviating from the Alpine Way Trail as the Goat Lake Trail because the surveyed map on Gaia GPS had labeled it as such.

Initially, the trail seemed to be well-used and easy-to-follow for the first half-mile.

Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_428_06172021 - Context of a side cascade backed by impressive jagged peaks typical of the Sawtooth Mountains
Context of a side cascade backed by impressive jagged peaks typical of the Sawtooth Mountains

As it made increasingly steeper climbs, we managed to catch glimpses of an attractive cascade running off the melting snow still clinging to the jagged peaks of the Sawtooth Mountains.

However, when we did encounter the next unsigned trail junction after that first half-mile, that was when the difficult part of the hike began.

At this unsigned trail junction, it turned out that the seemingly more obvious fork on the left descended and eventually went into overgrowth.

A fellow hiker that we met later in the day who did explore this fork said it wasn’t worth it as the overgrowth prevented any views of the bottom of what might be Goat Falls.

Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_180_06172021 - Mom climbing up a small rock-wedged gully shortly after an unsigned trail fork where we kept right instead of going left as we started the hard part of this adventure
Mom climbing up a small rock-wedged gully shortly after an unsigned trail fork where we kept right instead of going left as we started the hard part of this adventure

Instead, we kept to the right and went around the base of a rock or cliff before needing to use all four of our limbs to climb up a steep gully.

Right above this sketchy gully climb, we’d continue to follow more of the informal use-trail, and some of it made us doubt we were on the correct path because it involved climbing on tree roots or on steep rocks.

Indeed, with all the additional climbing we had to do, we definitely worried about how scary it would be to go back down this path as we encountered lots of loose dirt and rock that was easy to slip-and-fall on while continuing to slide over dropoffs.

It was in these sections that I realized why the authorities didn’t even bother putting any trail signage indicating Goat Lake.

Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_184_06172021 - Mom ascending more steep and tricky sections of the scramble to at least get up to Goat Falls
Mom ascending more steep and tricky sections of the scramble to at least get up to Goat Falls

After another 0.4 miles of really slow-and-steady progress while still relentlessly climbing, we finally made it to perhaps the best vantage point to view Goat Falls.

Even though we were able to see parts of Goat Falls earlier on towards the latter sections of this rough stretch, the best outcrop to view the falls was near its brink.

This view looked down and across the waterfall’s main section before it continued its turbulent tumble further downstream into the foliage.

While they may say this is Idaho’s tallest waterfall, there’s no way you can see all 650ft of it (if that’s the correct figure).

Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_239_06172021 - Context of part of Goat Falls with part of the Sawtooth Mountains in the distance
Context of part of Goat Falls with part of the Sawtooth Mountains in the distance

Maybe the only way you can see the whole thing in one go would be if you have a drone or some serious mountain goat capabilities.

Trail Description of Goat Falls and Goat Lake: From Goat Falls to Goat Lake

Beyond Goat Falls, following the trail gets even trickier.

Unless you know the trail or had a prior information to keep left and look for a logjam or beaver dam to cross Goat Creek, many people (us included) actually scrambled on the bouldery slopes to make it up to Goat Lake.

In fact, it was only when we started hiking back from Goat Lake that we realized the trail we should have taken in the first place.

Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_250_06172021 - Beyond Goat Falls, it was easy to lose the 'trail'. In hindsight, we should have looked for a logjam or beaver dam to cross Goat Creek to the left.  Instead, we followed some people who did the boulder scramble to the right side of the creek
Beyond Goat Falls, it was easy to lose the ‘trail’. In hindsight, we should have looked for a logjam or beaver dam to cross Goat Creek to the left. Instead, we followed some people who did the boulder scramble to the right side of the creek

In hindsight, had we crossed the logjam or beaver dam not far upstream from the brink of Goat Falls, we would have skirted by more waterfalls and cascades on Goat Creek before ending up at the mouth of Goat Lake.

Once we made it up to Goat Lake (the elevation gain for the final mile or so of the hike was about 700-800ft), that was when we witnessed the deep sappphire blue lake surrounded by what seems like a glacial cirque combined with a talus slope.

Given the level of effort to even get up here, we spent at least an hour having a picnic lunch while dipping our feet in the freezing cold water (enough to numb the feet).

After having our fill of Goat Lake, we then returned the way we came.

Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_284_06172021 - Once we made it to Goat Lake, we noticed another cascade feeding the lake way on its opposite side
Once we made it to Goat Lake, we noticed another cascade feeding the lake way on its opposite side

Even though the hike was mostly downhill on the way back, the steepness was such that it wasn’t any easier due to the danger of falling and sliding down the nearly vertical terrain.

Using at least one trekking pole to keep ourselves upright definitely helped with the balance as we descended, because if we leaned too far back, then that’s when the footing becomes undermined given the poor weight distribution on such slopes.

Indeed, just to give you an idea of how hard the Goat Lake Trail and scramble was after leaving the Alpine Way Trail, we took over 2 hours to get to Goat Lake while we took a little over 90 minutes to go down the same stretch of trail.

Authorities

Goat Falls resides in the Sawtooth Wilderness near Stanley in Custer County, Idaho. It is administered by the USDA Forest Service. For information or inquiries about the area as well as current conditions, visit their website.

Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_003_iPhone_06172021 - On the unpaved road leading us to the Iron Creek Trailhead
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_002_iPhone_06172021 - During our morning drive to the Iron Creek Trailhead, we spotted this deer
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_001_06172021 - When we started the hike for Goat Lake and Goat Falls before 7am, there weren't many cars at the Iron Creek Trailhead
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_002_06172021 - Mom approaching the signboards and the wilderness permit self-help kiosk at the Iron Creek Trailhead
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_005_06172021 - This was the self-help wilderness permit kiosk
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_012_06172021 - After filling out our wilderness permit, we attached our carbon copy to Mom's day pack
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_021_06172021 - Mom on the Stanley Lake Trail with hints of the Sawtooths looming above the trees
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_028_06172021 - The Stanley Lake Trail was generally flat with some slightly inclined sections
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_030_06172021 - Sign confirming that we were entering the Sawtooth Wilderness
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_032_06172021 - This signpost marked our departure point from the Stanley Lake Trail (which went towards Sawtooth Lake) as we now took the Alpine Way Trail (which headed towards Marshall Lake)
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_038_06172021 - Mom half-way across the tricky logjam traverse of Iron Creek when it was in high early Summer flow
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_042_06172021 - Beyond the Iron Creek crossing, the Alpine Way Trail was pretty straightforward though soon enough it would start climbing in earnest
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_045_06172021 - Mom continuing along the Alpine Way Trail, which started its climb. So it was a good thing we got the early start so we could benefit from the shade and cool air as much as possible before things really started to heat up later
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_058_06172021 - Looking back at a footbridge over a creek while on the Alpine Way Trail with some of the Sawtooth Mountains looming in the background
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_061_06172021 - Mom going up one of several switchbacks on the Alpine Way stretch of the hike
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_078_06172021 - Going by some attractive wildflowers in bloom while we made our traverse of the Alpine Way Trail
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_083_06172021 - Closeup of one of the flowers blooming alongside the Alpine Way Trail
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_100_06172021 - Another look at the context of the Alpine Way Trail with the Sawtooth Mountains looming above us while still having some snow in its drainages during our mid-June 2021 visit
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_102_06172021 - Mom still ascending on the Alpine Way Trail as it narrowed the further we went
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_114_06172021 - We encountered this fox trying to find a suitable place to feed on this squirrel or perhaps bring it to its young
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_115_06172021 - The same fox trotting further into the forest seemingly not caring that we were staring at it from the Alpine Way Trail
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_123_06172021 - Mom continuing on the Alpine Way Trail as we started to see more of the Sawtooth Mountains again
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_129_06172021 - This trail sign marked our departure point from the Alpine Way Trail and onto the unsigned 'Goat Lake Trail'
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_148_06172021 - Context of the Sawtooth Mountains and a mountain cascade kind of hiking in the depths of its morning shadow casted by the ravine or gully that it was in
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_160_06172021 - Even though the initial part of the Goat Lake stretch of the trail was on a well-used path, it already climbed pretty steeply
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_169_06172021 - Close-up morning look at the side cascade that got our attention though I suspected that it wasn't Goat Falls
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_178_06172021 - Mom approaching an unsigned and not-so-obvious trail fork, where we had to keep right to climb up some steep gullies and some rocks to continue towards Goat Falls and Goat Lake
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_182_06172021 - Looking down at Mom carefully making the rough scramble to continue the Goat Falls and Goat Lake hike shortly after keeping right at the unsigned fork
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_187_06172021 - Mom needed to scramble over these roots to continue towards Goat Falls and Goat Lake.  At this point, she really questioned whether we were on the correct trail or not
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_188_06172021 - Mom continuing the steep ascent towards Goat Falls and Goat Lake
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_190_06172021 - Closeup look at Mom being mindful of the loose footing of the 'trail', especially given the steepness of the climbing we had to do to even get to this point of the Goat Falls and Goat Lake hike and scramble
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_202_06172021 - More context of the steep climbing that we had to do in order to reach Goat Lake
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_205_06172021 - Looking towards a couple of the Sawtooth peaks while en route to Goat Falls and Goat Lake
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_217_06172021 - Our first glimpse at Goat Falls though it was still a very partial view at this point
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_219_06172021 - Mom continuing to follow the 'trail' towards the brink of Goat Falls
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_228_06172021 - Context of Goat Falls and the Sawtooth Mountains in the distance
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_231_06172021 - Looking further downhill where we noticed a small lake at the foot of the Sawtooth peaks and where Goat Creek was headed
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_233_06172021 - This was probably one of the cleanest views of Goat Falls that I could get
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_241_06172021 - Another look at the context of the Sawtooth Mountains and Goat Falls
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_242_06172021 - When we got to Goat Falls, we noticed another pair of hikers had caught up to us. This look back towards them kind of illustrated how much climbing and dangerously steep terrain we had to deal with to even get to this point
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_245_06172021 - Following another pair of hikers that had caught up to the both of us, but they opted to do boulder scrambling, which kind of got us to deviate from the surveyed trail lines provided on my Gaia GPS app
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_252_06172021 - Mom looking ahead at how far the other hikers had gone with their rock scrambling to get to Goat Lake
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_253_06172021 - Mom still on the non-trivial rock scrambling in pursuit of Goat Lake
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_254_06172021 - Mom making the final push up these boulders en route to the mouth of Goat Lake
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_255_06172021 - Looking back down at the boulder scrambling that we did to get to the mouth of Goat Lake
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_256_06172021 - Finally making it up to Goat Lake
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_273_06172021 - Context of Mom at the mouth of Goat Lake while I had scrambled a short ways up the boulders for a more top down look
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_282_06172021 - Broad view of the width of Goat Lake
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_289_06172021 - Crossing Goat Creek one last time to get to a suitable spot to get close to Goat Lake's shore
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_298_06172021 - Finally arriving at the shore of Goat Lake
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_303_06172021 - Looking back at a family (carrying a toddler) that we had chatted with from Salt Lake City as they were leaving Goat Lake
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_313_06172021 - Portrait view across Goat Lake towards a cascade still surrounded by snow
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_324_06172021 - Mom going down to the shore of Goat Lake
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_029_iPhone_06172021 - My swollen feet became numb as they were immersed in the icy cold waters of Goat Lake
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_329_06172021 - When we left Goat Lake and started to head back, we noticed a more obvious trail that apparently we should have followed on the way up
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_332_06172021 - Looking upstream at some small cascades on Goat Creek shortly downstream of Goat Lake
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_342_06172021 - Looking back down at an attractive waterfall between Goat Lake and Goat Falls
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_350_06172021 - Checking out a small rainbow in the mist of the attractive waterfall between Goat Lake and Goat Falls
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_351_06172021 - Looking back upstream at that attractive waterfall between Goat Lake and Goat Falls as we were further downstream
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_352_06172021 - Looking across Goat Creek at the talus or boulder field that we had scrambled on earlier. No wonder why we had such a hard time with it on the way to Goat Lake!
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_357_06172021 - Approaching the real steep part of the Goat Lake 'Trail'
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_361_06172021 - Mom approaching an open area near the brink of Goat Falls where there was a couple of hikers celebrating their accomplishment
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_362_06172021 - Looking way downhill at the valley that Stanley was in from the Goat Lake 'Trail'
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_367_06172021 - Mom slowly making her way down the steep terrain as we headed back from Goat Lake and towards the more legitimate trail down below
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_368_06172021 - Looking across the path of Goat Falls towards a couple of the Sawtooth peaks with a possible glacier (or former glacier) in between them
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_371_06172021 - Mom having a harder time going down the Goat Lake 'Trail' than going up due to the loose footing and steep terrain
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_374_06172021 - Another look at the steep context of the Goat Lake 'Trail' that we had to descend
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_383_06172021 - Context of Mom still making the long descent from Goat Lake to at least the more legitimate trail further below
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_388_06172021 - Staring in the distance at Stanley.  That shows just how far we had come
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_403_06172021 - Mom still carefully making the steep descent on the Goat Lake 'Trail'
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_417_06172021 - Finally making it down to the more legitimate trail just as we were passed by that first couple (a father-daughter combo) that caught up to us earlier this morning
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_437_06172021 - Last look back at the attractive side cascade tumbling near the unseen (from this vantage point) Goat Falls
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_440_06172021 - Mom going by one of the eccentric large boulders flanking the Goat Lake Trail
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_443_06172021 - Mom descending the narrow Alpine Way Trail though we noticed that there was far less shade at this time of the day than there was in the morning
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_455_06172021 - Not all of the return hike from Goat Lake was downhill, so we really felt it on the uphills
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_458_06172021 - Mom still descending the Alpine Way Trail with the Sawtooth Mountains looming larger the lower we went
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_468_06172021 - Mom going back across the log jam traverse of Iron Creek
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_471_06172021 - Finally on the north side of Iron Creek
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_477_06172021 - When Mom and I finally made it back from the Goat Falls and Goat Lake hike, the Iron Creek Trailhead was both crowded and  the weather was quite hot (in the 90F range when it was under 40F when we had gotten started)
Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_035_iPhone_06172021 - The surprises from our Goat Falls and Goat Lake hike didn't stop when we were driving back to Stanley as we noticed this fox trying to figure out if it should cross the unpaved road in front of us or not (so it kept going parallel to the road, doh!)


Goat Falls and Goat Lake is best accessed from the Iron Creek Trailhead.

This trailhead is only a 15-minute drive from Stanley.

Goat_Falls_and_Lake_hike_001_iPhone_06172021 - The unpaved road to the Iron Creek Trailhead gave us teasing glimpses of the attractive Sawtooth Mountains
The unpaved road to the Iron Creek Trailhead gave us teasing glimpses of the attractive Sawtooth Mountains

We got there by heading west on the Hwy 21 from Stanley for about 2 miles before turning left onto the unpaved road towards the Iron Creek Trailhead and Campground.

We then followed this unpaved road for another 3 miles before reaching the well-signed Iron Creek Trailhead on the right.

To give you some geographical context, the town of Stanley was 143 miles (under 3 hours drive) south of Twin Falls, 133 miles (also under 3 hours drive) northeast of Boise, 158 miles (over 3 hours drive) southeast of McCall, 200 miles (about 3.5 hours drive) west of Idaho Falls, and 256 miles (under 5 hours drive) south of Missoula, Montana.

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Trailside partial view of Goat Falls


Back and forth sweep of Goat Falls from perhaps the best viewing spot


Sweep showing context of partial view of Goat Falls from the 'trail'


Back and forth sweep of Goat Lake showing Stanley in the distance as well as the cascade at the head of the lake


Following along cascades from the other side of Goat Creek on the way out


Examining the companion waterfall on the Goat Falls Trail, but this time in much better lighting

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